Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

The Problem
I have a stored procedure which refuses to do a BULK INSERT from a csv file to a table when run through ODBC.

The Situation

  • The procedure is being called from an Excel VBA macro via ODBC
  • The source and destination machines are Windows 2008 R2 servers
  • The destination machine is running SQL Server 2008 R2
  • The data file that I need to load is stored on a third (Linux) file server
  • Both Windows machines are able to see he share via UNC path names or mapped drive letters
  • The share path has no permission restrictions in place.
  • We have domain level security in place
  • The windows account I'm using has admin rights to both servers (but not the domain)
  • We are using Windows NT authentication throughout the infrastructure.

The Errors I'm Seeing
When running the stored procedure to load a file via UNC pathnames, I receive an error from the SQL Server returned through ODBC, stating "Cannot bulk load because the file [filename] could not be opened. Operating system error code 5"

When running the stored procedure to load a file via a mapped drive letter, I receive an error from the SQL Server returned through ODBC, stating "Cannot bulk load because the file [filename] could not be opened. Operating system error code 3"

What have we tried?
The following scenarios work...

  • Storing the data file on the "C" drive of the target server instead of the network share
  • Running the stored procedure directly on the SQL Server, loading the file in either location

The following hasn't helped

  • We have set the SQL Server to run under a domain service account - and logging in with the service account locally works fine...
  • Logging in to ODBC with various different credentials

Why Can't We Use the Above Situations
The file to load is created by another system which only has access to write the output file to the shared path

Any further information can be provided if needed (so long as I can get hold of it)

Any help would be gratefully received!

share|improve this question
    
Maybe run the process with sysinternals process monitor running to see what specific operation is causing the access denied (5) error and what credentials are being used at the time –  Alex K. Nov 18 '11 at 14:47
    
... okay, although not having used that package before, it may take me some time! I will post any information gathered when I've got it :) –  Dave Rix Nov 21 '11 at 8:59

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.