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I'm in a situation where I have a 3rd party control to do something, which is set up as a generic. For UI reasons, I am stuck with this object. I also have our own control which interfaces with our data layer to do that thing, and does it on type object. No generics necessary. It figures out what to do and does it.

Here's a stripped down version of their structure (Note: I can't change this.)

public enum ThirdPartyTypesOfActions
{
    ThirdPartyDoAction1WithThing,
    ThirdPartyDoAction2WithThing,
    ThirdPartyDoAction3WithThing
}

public class ThirdPartyActionsToDo
{
    public ThirdPartyTypesOfActions TypeOfAction;
}

public class ThirdPartyDoAction1WithThing<T> : ThirdPartyActionsToDo
{
    public T Thing;
    public Type ThingType;
}

And Mine:

public enum MyActionTypes
{
    Action1,
    Action2,
    Action3
}

public class MyAction
{
    public object Thing;
    public MyActionTypes ActionToPerform;
}

So I have a converter, which looks something like:

public List<MyAction> ConvertTheirsToMine(List<ThirdPartyActionsToDo> actions)
{
    List<MyAction> retval=new List<MyAction>();

    foreach (ThirdPartyActionsToDo action in actions)
    {
        switch (action.TypeOfAction)
        {
            case ThirdPartyTypesOfActions.ThirdPartyDoAction1WithThing:
                retval.Add(HandleAction1(action));
                break;
            default:
                //Yeah, there's more, but they're the same
                break;
        }
    }
    return retval;
}

So there's the setup. Now for my attempts at implementing HandleAction1, which is where the problem happens.

This looked promising and compiled fine:

private MyAction HandleAction1(ThirdPartyActionsToDo action)
    {
        MyAction retval=new MyAction();

        ThirdPartyDoAction1WithThing<object> fullyQualified = (ThirdPartyDoAction1WithThing<object>) action;

        retval.ActionToPerform = MyActionTypes.Action1;
        retval.Thing = fullyQualified.Thing;

        return retval;
    }

But at runtime, it throws an exception, because it can't cast ThirdPartyDoAction1WithThing<string> as ThirdPartyDoAction1WithThing<object> No good.

But ThirdPartyActionsToDo gives me the type of the object I'm dealing with. Maybe I can use that?

private MyAction HandleAction1(ThirdPartyActionsToDo action)
{
    MyAction retval=new MyAction();

    Type tt = action.ThingType;

    ThirdPartyDoAction1WithThing<tt> fullyQualified = (ThirdPartyDoAction1WithThing<tt>) action;

    retval.ActionToPerform = MyActionTypes.Action1;
    retval.Thing = (object)fullyQualified.Thing;

    return retval;
}

This, of course, won't even compile.

the low-tech "You can't get there from here" solution is to do a switch statement on action.ThingType and individually handle every type I might care about. Obviously, I don't much care for this option, as I'd have to do it for each action type. Anyone see a way out of this mire?

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You seem to be bitter at their use of generics, but that was likely the proper way to handle it, rather than something that "figures out" what to do. –  drharris Nov 18 '11 at 15:37
    
Not bitter. I Like generics, but they're not the perfect solution to everything. In this case, Their use is great when you'll be generating dynamic SQL and know exactly which columns you'll be dealing with. Not so good when you're making a conversion between their front-end report generator and your ORM, both of which are handed to you from on high. –  James Fitch Nov 18 '11 at 16:07
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2 Answers 2

Since it seems like from your example that your only need to cast to the Generic type is to get a reference to the Thing property, you could use reflection to grab it without a cast:

    public static class PropertyExtractor
    {
        public static object GetProperty(object model, string propertyName)
        {
            var modelDescriptorCollection = TypeDescriptor.GetProperties(model);
            var modelData = modelDescriptorCollection.Find(propertyName, true);

            if (modelData != null)
            {
                return modelData.GetValue(model);
            }
            else
            {
                return null;
            }
        }
    }

Using this class, you could rewrite your HandleAction1 method like so:

private MyAction HandleAction1(ThirdPartyActionsToDo action)
{
    MyAction retval=new MyAction();

    retval.ActionToPerform = MyActionTypes.Action1;
    retval.Thing = PropertyExtractor.GetProperty(action, "Thing");

    return retval;
}
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It's a real pity that these types are in a third-party library; otherwise a covariant interface or a decent non-generic base-class could have come in handy.

A quick hack (if you are on .NET 4, C# 4) would be to us dynamic:

private MyAction HandleAction1(ThirdPartyActionsToDo action)
{
    return new MyAction
    {
        ActionToPerform = MyActionTypes.Action,
        Thing = ((dynamic)action).Thing
    };
}

This should work well as long as the ThirdPartyActionsToDo action argument is always a ThirdPartyActionsToDo<SomeType>.

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