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I'm seeing some class loading behavior that appears to be inconsistent with the JVM spec and am wondering if this is a bug. Or if not, hoping someone can explain why.

The example code found below simply prints hello from its main method. It has an unused method that contains a method call to a method that declares it takes a 'C' (which is an interface) as an argument.

When the main is executed (without A, B, and C in the class path) a ClassNotFound Error is thrown for Interface C. (Note C is never actually needed at runtime since it is only referenced in a method that never executes).

This appears to be a violation of the JVM specification

Section 2.17.1 of the Java VM Spec, 2nd edition says:

The only requirement regarding when resolution is performed is that any errors detected during resolution must be thrown at a point in the program where some action is taken by the program that might, directly or indirectly, require linkage to the class or interface involved in the error

Section 2.17.3 of the Java VM Spec, 2nd edition says:

The Java programming language allows an implementation flexibility as to when linking activities (and, because of recursion, loading) take place, provided that the semantics of the language are respected, that a class or interface is completely verified and prepared before it is initialized, and that errors detected during linkage are thrown at a point in the program where some action is taken by the program that might require linkage to the class or interface involved in the error.

Note: If I change the type of the parameter on the definition to a class instead of an interface then the code loads and executes correctly.

/**
 * This version fails, the method call in neverCalled() is to a method whose 
 * parameter definition is for an Interface
 */
public class Main {

    public  void neverCalled(){
          A a = new A();
          B b = new B(); // B implements C

          //method takeInter is declared to take paramters of type Interface C
          //This code is causes a ClassNotFound error do be thrown when Main
          //is loaded if A, B, and C is not in the class path
          a.takeInter(b); 
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        System.out.println("Hello...");
    }
}


/**
 * This version runs, the method call in neverCalled() is to a method whose 
 * parameter definition is for a Class
 */
public class Main {

    public  void neverCalled(){
          A a = new A();
          B b = new B(); // B implements C

          //method takeInter is declared to take paramters of type Interface C
          //This code is causes a ClassNotFound error do be thrown when Main
          //is loaded if A, B, and C is not in the class path
          a.takeClass(b); 
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        System.out.println("Hello...");
    }
}


public class A {
    public void takeClass(B in){};
    public void takeInter(C in){}
}

public class B implements C {}

public interface C {}

Ed,

I wasn't intentionally trying to take the quote out of context I pulled out what I thought was the relevant part. Thank you for helping me try to understand this.

Anyhow, the spec seems pretty clear to me. It says the errors must be thrown at a point not by a point. Granted I read the VM spec after reading the following in Chapter 8 of Inside The Java Virtual Machine, so maybe that colored my interpretation.

From, http://www.artima.com/insidejvm/ed2/linkmod.html

As described in Chapter 7, "The Lifetime of a Class," different implementations of the Java virtual machine are permitted to perform resolution at different times during the execution of a program. An implementation may choose to link everything up front by following all symbolic references from the initial class, then all symbolic references from subsequent classes, until every symbolic reference has been resolved. In this case, the application would be completely linked before its main() method was ever invoked. This approach is called early resolution. Alternatively, an implementation may choose to wait until the very last minute to resolve each symbolic reference. In this case, the Java virtual machine would resolve a symbolic reference only when it is first used by the running program. This approach is called late resolution. Implementations may also use a resolution strategy in-between these two extremes.

Although a Java virtual machine implementation has some freedom in choosing when to resolve symbolic references, every Java virtual machine must give the outward impression that it uses late resolution. No matter when a particular Java virtual machine performs its resolution, it will always throw any error that results from attempting to resolve a symbolic reference at the point in the execution of the program where the symbolic reference was actually used for the first time. In this way, it will always appear to the user as if the resolution were late. If a Java virtual machine does early resolution, and during early resolution discovers that a class file is missing, it won't report the class file missing by throwing the appropriate error until later in the program when something in that class file is actually used. If the class is never used by the program, the error will never be thrown.

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I'm a bit confused: you wrote that "C is never actually needed at runtime since it is only referenced in a method that never executes". This seems to be something different than the title of your question if I'm not mistaken. Shouldn't you edit your question's title to reflect the fact that you're actually not doing a method call? –  TacticalCoder Nov 18 '11 at 16:27
    
I meant the presence of a method call... will try to make the question clearer, thanks. –  Eric Rosenberg Nov 18 '11 at 16:50
    
I agree turning verification off makes the error go away, but why? The VM spec says such errors shouldn't be thrown until the code is actually used. In this case the code that is causing the error is never used. –  Eric Rosenberg Nov 18 '11 at 20:23
    
Looks like the book's wrong, IMHO. Read the last two sentences from the quote I included in the answer, and try to reconcile them with the book. You can't just cherry-pick what's there. It's not a perfect spec - you'll end up where you are. –  Ed Staub Nov 19 '11 at 16:43
    
I invited Bill Venners to weigh in. –  Ed Staub Nov 19 '11 at 17:18
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2 Answers 2

Here is a simpler example which also fails.

public class Main {
    public void neverCalled() {
        A a = new A();
        B b = new B();
        a.takeInter(b);
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        System.out.println("Hello...");
    }
}

class A {
    public void takeInter(A in) {
    }
}

class B extends A {
}

class C {
}

in the byte code

public void neverCalled();
 Code:
   0: new           #2                  // class A
   3: dup           
   4: invokespecial #3                  // Method A."<init>":()V
   7: astore_1      
   8: new           #4                  // class B
  11: dup           
  12: invokespecial #5                  // Method B."<init>":()V
  15: astore_2      
  16: aload_1       
  17: aload_2       
  18: invokevirtual #6                  // Method A.takeInter:(LA;)V
  21: return   

The b is implicitly cast to an A and it appears to need to check this.

If you turn all verification off, no error occurs.

$ rm A.class B.class C.class 
$ java -Xverify:none -cp . Main
Hello...
$ java -cp . Main
Exception in thread "main" java.lang.NoClassDefFoundError: A
share|improve this answer
    
Peter, thanks for the clarification. However, I still don't understand why it is throwing the error before the code is used. It seems to conflict the VM spec. –  Eric Rosenberg Nov 18 '11 at 17:05
    
When it loads the class it verifies the byte code, unless you try byte code verification off. You could log it as a bug, as it appears to be an edge case that hasn't been considered. –  Peter Lawrey Nov 19 '11 at 11:54
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Your quote from Section 2.17.1 was massively out of context. It's in bold below. When read in context, it's clear that "errors...must be thrown at a point in the program..." means "errors...must be thrown by the time the program reaches a point...". The sentence, by itself, could be worded better - but it's not by itself.

The resolution step is optional at the time of initial linkage. An implementation may resolve a symbolic reference from a class or interface that is being linked very early, even to the point of resolving all symbolic references from the classes and interfaces that are further referenced, recursively. (This resolution may result in errors from further loading and linking steps.) This implementation choice represents one extreme and is similar to the kind of static linkage that has been done for many years in simple implementations of the C language.

An implementation may instead choose to resolve a symbolic reference only when it is actually used; consistent use of this strategy for all symbolic references would represent the "laziest" form of resolution. In this case, if Terminator had several symbolic references to another class, the references might be resolved one at a time or perhaps not at all, if these references were never used during execution of the program.

The only requirement regarding when resolution is performed is that any errors detected during resolution must be thrown at a point in the program where some action is taken by the program that might, directly or indirectly, require linkage to the class or interface involved in the error. In the "static" example implementation choice described earlier, loading and linking errors could occur before the program is executed if they involved a class or interface mentioned in the class Terminator or any of the further, recursively referenced classes and interfaces. In a system that implemented the "laziest" resolution, these errors would be thrown only when a symbolic reference was used.

The two subsequent sentences make the meaning very clear.

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