Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I was wondering if there was a way to get the number of results from a MySQL query, and at the same time limit the results.

The way pagination works (as I understand it), first I do something like

query = SELECT COUNT(*) FROM `table` WHERE `some_condition`

After I get the num_rows(query), I have the number of results. But then to actually limit my results, I have to do a second query like:

query2 = SELECT COUNT(*) FROM `table` WHERE `some_condition` LIMIT 0, 10

My question: Is there anyway to both retrieve the total number of results that would be given, AND limit the results returned in a single query? Or any more efficient way of doing this. Thanks!

share|improve this question

7 Answers 7

up vote 35 down vote accepted

No, that's how many applications that want to paginate have to do it. It's reliable and bullet-proof, albeit it makes the query twice. But you can cache the count for a few seconds and that will help a lot.

The other way is to use SQL_CALC_FOUND_ROWS clause and then call SELECT FOUND_ROWS(). apart from the fact you have to put the FOUND_ROWS() call afterwards, there is a problem with this: There is a bug in MySQL that this tickles that affects ORDER BY queries making it much slower on large tables than the naive approach of two queries.

share|improve this answer
    
Excellent, thanks for your help! –  ash May 4 '09 at 2:49
1  
It's not quite race-condition proof, however, unless you do the two queries within a transaction. This generally isn't a problem, though. –  NickZoic May 4 '09 at 3:23
    
By "reliable" I meant the SQL itself is always going to return the result you want, and by "bullet-proof" I meant that there are no MySQL bugs hampering what SQL you can use. Unlike using SQL_CALC_FOUND_ROWS with ORDER BY and LIMIT, according to the bug I mentioned. –  staticsan May 4 '09 at 4:30
    
+1. Hadn't heard about the bug before –  Manos Dilaverakis Jun 22 '10 at 17:38
5  
On complex queries, using SQL_CALC_FOUND_ROWS to fetch the count in the same query will almost always be slower than doing two separate queries. This is because it means all rows will need to be retrieved in full, regardless of the limit, then only those specified in the LIMIT clause are returned. See also my response which has links. –  thomasrutter Sep 8 '11 at 5:21

I almost never do two queries.

Simply return one more row than is needed, only display 10 on the page, and if there are more than are displayed, display a "Next" button.

SELECT x, y, z FROM `table` WHERE `some_condition` LIMIT 0, 11
// iterate through and display 10 rows.

// if there were 11 rows, display a "Next" button.

Your query should return in an order of most relevant first. Chances are, most people aren't going to care about going to page 236 out of 412.

When you do a google search, and your results aren't on the first page, you likely go to page two, not nine.

share|improve this answer
    
This is true, I will keep that in mind. –  ash Jul 24 '10 at 18:59
18  
Actually, if I don't find it on the first page of a Google query, usually I do skip to page nine. –  Phil May 18 '11 at 5:42
    
@Phil I heard this before but why do that? –  TK123 May 13 '12 at 4:56
4  
COUNT is an aggregate function. How do you return the count and all the results in one query? The above query will only return 1 row, no matter what the LIMIT is set at. If you add GROUP BY, it'll return all results but the COUNT will be inaccurate –  pixelfreak Nov 29 '12 at 9:57
1  
The result of count is usefull to calculate how many pages will be needed to see the total number of rows. –  rvazquezglez Mar 22 '13 at 18:21

Another approach to avoiding double-querying is to fetch all the rows for the current page using a LIMIT clause first, then only do a second COUNT(*) query if the maximum number of rows were retrieved.

In many applications, the most likely outcome will be that all of the results fit on one page, and having to do pagination is the exception rather than the norm. In these cases, the first query will not retrieve the maximum number of results.

For example, answers on a stackoverflow question rarely spill onto a second page. Comments on an answer rarely spill over the limit of 5 or so required to show them all.

So in these applications you can simply just do a query with a LIMIT first, and then as long as that limit is not reached, you know exactly how many rows there are without the need to do a second COUNT(*) query - which should cover the majority of situations.

share|improve this answer
    
Excellent point! –  Andrei Taranchenko Jun 5 '12 at 9:22
    
@thomasrutter I had the same approach, however discovered a flaw with it today. The final page of results will not then have the pagination data. i.e., let's say each page should have 25 results, the last page will likely not have that many, let's say it has 7... that means the count(*) will never be run, and so no pagination will be displayed to the user. –  duellsy Aug 21 '12 at 6:34
    
No - if you are say, 200 results in, you query the next 25 and you only get 7 back, that tells you that the total number of results is 207 and therefore you don't need to do another query with COUNT(*) because you already know what it's going to say. You have all the information you need to show pagination. If you are having a problem with pagination not showing to the user then you have a bug somewhere else. –  thomasrutter Aug 22 '12 at 2:38

In most situations it is much faster and less resource intensive to do it in two separate queries than to do it in one, even though that seems counter-intuitive.

If you use SQL_CALC_FOUND_ROWS, then for large tables it makes your query much slower, significantly slower even than executing two queries, the first with a COUNT(*) and the second with a LIMIT. The reason for this is that SQL_CALC_FOUND_ROWS causes the LIMIT clause to be applied after fetching the rows instead of before, so it fetches the entire row for all possible results before applying the limits. This can't be satisfied by an index because it actually fetches the data.

If you take the two queries approach, the first one only fetching COUNT(*) and not actually fetching and actual data, this can be satisfied much more quickly because it can usually use indexes and doesn't have to fetch the actual row data for every row it looks at. Then, the second query only needs to look at the first $offset+$limit rows and then return.

This post from the MySQL performance blog explains this further:

http://www.mysqlperformanceblog.com/2007/08/28/to-sql_calc_found_rows-or-not-to-sql_calc_found_rows/

For more information on optimising pagination, check this post and this post.

share|improve this answer
query = SELECT col, col2, (SELECT COUNT(*) FROM `table`) AS total FROM `table` WHERE `some_condition` LIMIT 0, 10
share|improve this answer
8  
This query just returns the total number of record in the table; not the number of records that match the condition. –  Lawrence Barsanti May 3 '10 at 0:51

My answer may be late, but you can skip the second query (with the limit) and just filter the info through your back end script. In PHP for instance, you could do something like:

if($queryResult > 0) {
   $counter = 0;
   foreach($queryResult AS $result) {
       if($counter >= $startAt AND $counter < $numOfRows) {
            //do what you want here
       }
   $counter++;
   }
}

But of course, when you have thousands of records to consider, it becomes inefficient very fast. Pre-calculated count maybe a good idea to look into.

Here's a good read on the subject: http://www.percona.com/ppc2009/PPC2009_mysql_pagination.pdf

share|improve this answer
1  
thanks for sharing this link! –  Vikram Aug 7 '12 at 17:01
    
Yes, this link is exactly has valuable information. –  Nuri Akman Dec 17 '12 at 22:40
    
Link's dead, I guess this is the correct one: percona.com/files/presentations/ppc2009/…. Won't edit because not sure if it is. –  hectorg87 Jul 10 at 13:53
SELECT * 
FROM table 
WHERE some_condition 
ORDER BY RAND()
LIMIT 0, 10
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.