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I want to call destructor of an instance (proc) always before my program ends, especially after return 1 or exit() in main.

I found C++ function atexit(), but it requires pointer to void function with no argument, so the code below cannot be compiled. How I can solve it, please?

Destructor of my instance requires MySQL connection.

#include <WinSock.h>
#include <iostream>
#include <cstdio>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <mysql.h>
#include <string>

// Declarations for Mysql DB

using namespace std;

class Process {
  public:
     ~Process();
};

Process::~Process ()
{
    // Interaction with DB
}

int main(void) 
{
  // Join to DB

  atexit(proc.~Process); // Call desctructor of instance proc before program ends

  Process proc;

  // App code

  return 0;
}
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1  
Why are you trying to do this? There is a chance that what You are trying to doesn't really need you to do this at all.It is definitely not needed in the example you show because destructor of proc will be automatically called before main returns,but that seems to be just a demonstration example. –  Alok Save Nov 18 '11 at 16:43
    
related? research.ibm.com/designpatterns/pubs/ph-jun96.txt (the link refers to destroying a Singleton elegantly. This has been the only time I have attempted something similar to what you are trying to do.) –  Tom Nov 18 '11 at 16:55
1  
see related parashift.com/c++-faq-lite/ctors.html#faq-10.14 –  sehe Nov 18 '11 at 17:00
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5 Answers 5

up vote 6 down vote accepted

proc has automatic duration, i.e. when exiting main, it will be destroyed automatically (and the destructor invoked) - you don't need the atexit business..

Unless as @Rob mentions below, you call exit() in your code somewhere... if that's the case, then you'll have to allocate Process on the heap, provide a function that atexit can call which is aware of this instance, and delete it there...

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1  
Unless he plans on calling exit() from the bowels of his program. –  Robᵩ Nov 18 '11 at 16:46
    
@Rob - hmmm..., I'll modify my answer... –  Nim Nov 18 '11 at 16:47
    
Yes, it is true... Main error was elsewhere. Thanks! –  Miloš Havlíček Nov 18 '11 at 17:17
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Just make it a global std::auto_ptr<> or std::unique_ptr<>:

std::auto_ptr<Process> proc; // 1) initialized with NULL before main() is called

int main() {
    proc.reset(new Process); // 2) re-initialized
}

// 3) proc destructor is called after main() exits
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1  
+1 I like it :-) –  Kerrek SB Nov 18 '11 at 16:55
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Use C++:

#include <memory>

std::unique_ptr<Process> g_proc;

int main()
{
  g_proc.reset(new Process(some, runtime, params));

  // all done!
}

Objects of static storage duration (e.g. globals, like our g_proc here) are destroyed after main exits, and the destructor of unique_ptr will take care of the object destruction.

Alternatively you can make g_proc a static variable inside main, though that's a bit unusual.

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Change your program logic slightly to allocate your Process object dynamically:

Process *pProc;

void killProc() {
  delete pProc;
}

int main(void) 
{
  // Join to DB

  atexit(killProc); // Call desctructor of instance proc before program ends

  pProc = new Process();
  Process& proc = *pProc;

  // App code

  return 0;
}
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As proc is not a pointer, it will be automatically deleted at the end of the main() function, and it's destructor will be called (before the memory is deallocated).

The atexit() function is not a C++ function, but is part of the standard C library.

If you need to call the destructor BEFORE the end of the main() function, you need to allocate the proc variable as a pointer.

You can also avoid the usage of global variables plus C functions by using an application class this way:

class Application
{
 public:
 Application() { proc = new Process(); /* other init code */ }
 ~Application() { delete proc; /* other clean-up code */ }

 int run()
 {
  /* your application code goes here */
 }

 private:
 Process *proc;
}

int main()
{
 Application app;
 int result = app.run();
 /* Post clean-up code */
 return result;
}

If you plan using C++11 can also rely on the 'unique_ptr' template. Avoid using 'auto_ptr' since it is deprecated.

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Funny you'd say "The atexit() function is not a C++ function, but is part of the standard C library." Implementation detail, but if you look into assembly output the constructors of global objects register their destructors with atexit(). See -fuse-cxa-atexit gcc option. –  Maxim Yegorushkin Nov 18 '11 at 22:23
    
Does this make atexit() a C++ function? It is part of the C library, even if used in C++ code (same as the exit() function). –  WiseDevil Nov 18 '11 at 23:04
    
C++ standard requires atexit() in 18.3 Start and termination. –  Maxim Yegorushkin Nov 20 '11 at 20:24
    
Indeed it does require it. –  WiseDevil Nov 21 '11 at 9:23
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