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When I run the following code:

public class Test {

  Test(){
    System.out.println("1");
  }

  {
    System.out.println("2");
  }

  static {
    System.out.println("3");
  }

  public static void main(String args[]) {
    new Test();
  }
}

I expect to get the output in this order:

1
2
3

but what I got is in reverse order:

3
2
1

Can anyone explain why it is output in reverse order?

================

Also, when I create more than one instance of Test:

new Test();
new Test();
new Test();
new Test();

static block is executed only at first time.

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11  
+1 See also §8.7 Static Initializers. –  trashgod Nov 18 '11 at 16:44
14  
Out of curiosity, why do you consider this behavior strange? Why do you expect the blocks to run in the order you describe? –  Daniel Pryden Nov 18 '11 at 21:31

9 Answers 9

up vote 62 down vote accepted

It all depends on the order of execution of initialization statements. Your test demonstrates that this order is:

  1. Static initialization blocks
  2. Instance initialization blocks
  3. Constructors

Edit

Thanks for the comments, now I can quote the appropriate part in the JVM specification. Here it is, the detailed initialization procedure.

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11  
nitpick: the test proves nothing. It does demonstrate the order you describe. For a proof, you need to look at the Java Language Spec. –  ObscureRobot Nov 18 '11 at 17:43
6  
double nitty pick - I'd suggest looking at the VM spec, not the language spec. Specifically, section 2.17. (note, some initializers are executed in textual order). –  ccoakley Nov 18 '11 at 18:55
    
Both for good measure. –  ObscureRobot Nov 18 '11 at 20:15
3  
@ObscureRobot: Whether you call it "proves" or "demonstrates", its the same thing: an emperical fact. The specs say what SHOULD happen, which may or may not match with what /does/ happen. Given that the OP expected something else, either word would be appropriate (although I will grant that demonstrates is a bit better). –  jmoreno Nov 19 '11 at 4:05
3  
no, proof and demonstrations are very different. As are general theories and individual pieces of empirical evidence. Just because you observe some behavior on your desktop today doesn't mean that it will be there tomorrow. It may be that you are simply observing a quirk of the current implementation that will go away the next time you update your JDK or JRE. The difference is subtle but important. "Proof" has very little use in software development... unless you are talking to your boss about the budget for new hardware :) –  ObscureRobot Nov 19 '11 at 5:26

3 - is a static initializer, it runs once when the class is loaded, which happens first.

2 - is an initializer block, the java compiler will actually copy this into each constructor, so you can share some initialization between contructors if you like. Rarely used.

1 - will be executed when you construct the object, after (3) and (2)..

More information here

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Static blocks are executed first.

And then the instance instance intialization blocks

Please see JLS for instance intializers

{

// sop statement

}

you cannot have a return statment within the instance initialization block, just like constructors.

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Test(){System.out.println("1");}

    {System.out.println("2");}

    static{System.out.println("3");}

static things are executed first, {System.out.println("2");} isn't a part of a function, because of its scope it is called first, and Test(){System.out.println("1");} is called last because the other two are called first

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First, class is loaded into the JVM and class initialization happens. During this step static blocks are executed. "{...}" is just a syntactic equivalent of "static{...}". Since there is already a "static{...}" block in the code, "{...}" will be appended to it. That's why you have 3 printed before 2.

Next once the class is loaded, java.exe (which I assumed you executed from the command line) will find and run the main method. The main static method initializes the instance whose constructor is invoked, so you get "1" printed last.

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The block printing 2 is an instance initializer: java.sun.com/docs/books/jls/third_edition/html/classes.html#8.6 . It is not equivalent to a static initializer. –  Samuel Edwin Ward Nov 19 '11 at 0:16
    
ah, you're right –  Dmitry Beransky Nov 19 '11 at 0:25

Because the static{} code is run when the class is first initialized within the JVM (i.e. even before main() is called), the instance {} is called when an instance is first initialized, before it's constructed, and then the constructor is called after all that is done.

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I‘ve get the bytecode-like code here by ASM .

I think this can answer your question , explaining what happened when a object is created in this occasion.

public class Test {
static <clinit>() : void
GETSTATIC System.out : PrintStream
LDC "3"
INVOKEVIRTUAL PrintStream.println(String) : void
RETURN


<init>() : void
ALOAD 0: this
INVOKESPECIAL Object.<init>() : void
GETSTATIC System.out : PrintStream
LDC "2"
INVOKEVIRTUAL PrintStream.println(String) : void
GETSTATIC System.out : PrintStream
LDC "1"
INVOKEVIRTUAL PrintStream.println(String) : void
RETURN

public static main(String[]) : void
NEW Test
INVOKESPECIAL Test.<init>() : void
RETURN
}

we can see LDC "3" is in the "clinit" , this is a class initializer .

The lifetime of a object usually is : loading class -> linking class -> class initialization -> object instantiation -> use -> GC . That's why 3 appears first. And as this is in the class level , not object level , it will appear once as class type will be loaded once . For details , referencing to inside the Java2 Virtual Machine : life time of a type

LDC "2" and `LDC "1" is in "init" , the constructor.

Reason why it's in this order is : Constructor will first execute some implict instruction such as super constructor and code in the {} of a class , then execute code which's in their construtor explicit.

That's what a compiler will do to the java file.

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It is not strange behaviour. It is what the code is supposed to do.

Static block will be called only once in the very beginning when the program is run. (That is what static block is meant for)

Then the Instance initalization block will be called and after that the constructor.

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It doesn't look like anyone stated why the 3 is only printed once explicitly. So I would add that this is related to why it is printed first.

Statically defined code is flagged as being separate from any particular instance of the class. In general, statically defined code can be considered to not be any class at all (of course there's some invalidity in that statement when scoping is considered). Thus that code gets run once the class is loaded, as stated above, as in, it isn't being called when an instance is constructed Test(), thus calling the constructor multiple times will not result in the static code being run anymore.

The bracketed code containing the 2 gets prepended to the construct, as started above, because it is sort of a precondition to all of the constructors in the class. You don't know what will happen in the constructors for Test, but you are guaranteed that they all start by printing 2. Thus this happens before anything in any specific constructor, and is called every time a(ny) constructor is called.

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