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I can't figure out what's wrong with this very simple snippet:

class A(object):
        def printme(self):
                print "A"

        self.printme()

a = A()

Traceback (most recent call last): File "prog.py", line 1, in class A(object): File "prog.py", line 5, in A self.printme() NameError: name 'self' is not defined

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4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The following should explain the problem. Maybe you will want to try this?

class A(object):
    def printme(self):
        print "A"
a = A()
a.printme()

The name self is only defined inside methods that explicitly declare a parameter called self. It is not defined at the class scope.

The class scope is executed only once, at class definition time. "Calling" the class with A() calls it's constructor __init__() instead. So maybe you actually want this:

class A(object):
    def __init__(self):
        self.printme()
    def printme(self):
        print "A"
a = A()
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Sven- I know that works, but what I'm trying to do is access the method within the class body. Is self not callable within a class instance? –  Yarin Nov 18 '11 at 17:24
    
Why are you trying to do this? –  Blender Nov 18 '11 at 17:25
1  
@Yarin: What do you mean by "callable", and what by "within a class instance"? There is no instance of the class at definition time -- the class isn't even defined yet, so there can't be an instance. –  Sven Marnach Nov 18 '11 at 17:26
    
@Sven- ok that makes sense- my call belongs within the init body... little rusty this morning. –  Yarin Nov 18 '11 at 17:31

It's exactly what it says: self is not defined when you call self.printme(). self isn't magically defined for you in Python; it only works inside a method which has an argument named self. If it helps, try replacing the word self with something else, say foo, throughout your program (because there is really nothing special about self as an identifier).

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You still define init with self as an argument. –  Thomas Orozco Nov 18 '11 at 17:31
    
Thomas- yeah i just figured it out- had already deleted the comment- thanks –  Yarin Nov 18 '11 at 17:33

If you're intending for the function to run each time an instance of the class is created, try this:

class A(object):
    def __init__(self):
        self.printme()

    def printme(self):
        print "A"

a = A()
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Thanks- what i was looking for- Sven just got there first –  Yarin Nov 18 '11 at 17:32

if you want to print something when you instantiate the object use:

class A(object):
    def __init__(self):
            self.printme()

    def printme(self):
            print "A"

a = A()
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