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I am horrible at RegEx expressions and I just don't use them often enough for me to remember the syntax between uses.

I am using grepWin to search my files. I need to do a search that will return the files that have a given string twice.

So, for example, if I was searching on the word "how", then file one would not match:

Hello
how are you today?

but file two would:

Hello
how are you today?

I am fine, how are you?

Any one know how to make a RegEx that will match that?

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1  
If the search string has to be a variable, then this is not possible with Regex. You would need to combine it with a scripting language. If it doesn't need to be variable then this regex would do: how are you.*how are you –  Jeff Nov 18 '11 at 17:29
    
@Jeff It is possible to refer back to a matched group in a JavaScript Regular expression: /(abc)\1/ matches abcabc, but not abc. –  Rob W Nov 18 '11 at 17:30
    
Must it match only if "how" appears exactly twice? What if it appears three or more times? –  Wiseguy Nov 18 '11 at 17:32
    
@RobW Awesome tip. Thanks! –  Jeff Nov 22 '11 at 18:33

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

something like this (depends on language and your specific task)

\(how.*){2}\

Edit: according to @CodeJockey

\^(([^h]|h[^o]|ho[^w])*how([^h]|h[^o]|ho[^w])*){2,2}$\

(it become more complicated) @CodeJockey: Thanks for comments

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3  
this will get files with how two or more times, but does not exclude files with three or more occurrences –  Code Jockey Nov 18 '11 at 17:49
    
yes, you are right –  VMykyt Nov 18 '11 at 17:50
1  
@CodeJockey That's how I read it, too. I was wondering if the asker meant exactly twice. –  Wiseguy Nov 18 '11 at 17:50
    
ummm... the second expression doesn't improve the situation... the first expression correctly asserts that there are exactly two instances of how followed by anything (or nothing), but it does not prevent a third, fourth, fifth, etc instance of how from being in the file - in other words, I think you misunderstood my comment if you attributed the modification to me –  Code Jockey Nov 18 '11 at 17:58
1  
+1 actually tested in grepWin and works (just remove the ` characters, please, before putting the expression into the search field). Though... {2}` is the same as {2,2}, and even though it would be a pain to create by hand... :D –  Code Jockey Nov 18 '11 at 18:57

I don't know what grepWin supports, but here's what I came up with to make something match exactly twice.

/^((?!how).)*how((?!how).)*how((?!how).)*$/

Explanation:

/^             # start of subject
  ((?!how).)*  # any text that does not contain "how"
  how          # the word "how"
  ((?!how).)*  # any text that does not contain "how"
  how          # the word "how"
  ((?!how).)*  # any text that does not contain "how"
$/             # end of subject

This ensures that you find two "how"s, but the texts between the "how"s and to either side of them do not contain "how".

Of course, you can substitute any string for "how" in the expression.


If you want to "simplify" by only writing the search expression twice, you can use backreferences thus:

/^(?:(?!how).)*(how)(?:(?!\1).)*\1(?:(?!\1).)*$/

Refiddle with this expression

Explanation:
I added ?: to make the negative lookaheads' text non-capturing. Then I added parentheses around the regular how to make that a capturing subpattern (the first and only one).

I had to include "how" again in the first lookahead because it's a negative lookahead (meaning any capture would not contain "how") and the captured "how" is not captured yet at that point.

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This is significantly harder than I originally thought it would be, and requires variable-length lookbehind, which grepWin does not support...

this expression:

 (?<!blah.{0,99999})blah(?=.*?blah)(?!.*blah.*blah)

was successfully used in Eclipse, using the "Search > File" dialog to exclude files with one and three instances of blah and to include files with exactly two instances of blah.

Eclipse does not permit a .* in lookbehind, so I used .{0,99999} instead.

It is possible, with the right tool, but It isn't pretty to get it to work with grepWin (see answer above). Can you use other tools (such as Eclipse) and what did you want to do with the files afterwards?

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If lookbehinds are a problem, I did it with only lookaheads. –  Wiseguy Nov 18 '11 at 20:04
    
yeah - I haven't bothered once I tested @VMykyt's solution in the product requested and it worked (especially without any apparent interest from the OP). When I was originally working it out, my brain somehow temporarily lost the idea of the beginning-of-line-or-string anchor, which should make it possible without look-behind :D –  Code Jockey Nov 18 '11 at 20:09
    
@Wiseguy I do like that your solution uses whole words though... anyways, though it would not be too hard to add, noone has yet accounted for the fact that the OP may want to only match files with two instances of how, but allow "howitzer" or "somehow" or even "shower" any number of times –  Code Jockey Nov 18 '11 at 20:13
    
True story, though then you could simply make the search phrase \bhow\b. –  Wiseguy Nov 18 '11 at 20:19
    
@Wiseguy like I said, "not be too hard" ... but diminishing returns (the OP is an established member and will probably come back, though) –  Code Jockey Nov 18 '11 at 20:27

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