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I was wondering what would be the best way of writing the endianess independent code especially when accessing the bit fields with the array "test_attr[0]/test_attr[1]"?.

struct tagTest
{
    union
    {
        struct
        {
            uint16 A:3;  
            uint16 B:3;  
            uint16 C:3;  
            uint16 D:3;  
            uint16 E:3;  
            uint16 F:1;
            uint16 G:3;  
            uint16 H:3;  
            uint16 I:3;  
            uint16 J:3;  
            uint16 K:4;  
        } Attributes;

        uint16 test_attr[2];  
    } EndianIndependent;
};               
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Bitfields are implementation dependent, you should be worrying about that before worrying about endianness. –  K-ballo Nov 18 '11 at 17:58
    
I agree with you but in my case i am forced to do this as i don't have any other option. –  gattu Nov 18 '11 at 18:00
    
What PRECISELY is it that you are trying to accomplish? –  John R. Strohm Nov 18 '11 at 18:04
    
If i access test_attr[0] in both machines, i should be able to get the same number. For ex: if i store the value as "0x0001" in test_attr[0] and print this in both machines i should get "0x0001". –  gattu Nov 18 '11 at 18:14
1  
@user1054335, that will happen on any sane compiler, right? if you assign a value to an array and print it, you will get the same value. What isn't portable is that test_attr[0]= 0x0001; may make Attributes.A == 4 or Attributes.F == 1 or Attributes.G==4 or Attributes.K==1. I don't think it is possible to write this portably without using platform-specific defines. –  AShelly Nov 18 '11 at 19:45
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3 Answers

The following way is used in some sources:

struct
{
#if BYTE_ORDER == LITTLE_ENDIAN
   uint16 A:4;  
   uint16 B:4;  
   uint16 C:4;  
   uint16 D:4;  
#endif
#if BYTE_ORDER == BIG_ENDIAN
   uint16 D:4;  
   uint16 C:4;  
   uint16 B:4;  
   uint16 A:4;  
#endif
} Attributes;

But it really looks ugly. And maybe it is not so portable. Probably it is better to use bit masks and bit shiftings instead of bit fileds.

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Even, I would prefer the bit masks and bit shifting. Are there any functions available which does this? This would save lot of time for most of the people.. –  gattu Nov 18 '11 at 19:44
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The bit-field-ordering is implementation dependent, and needn't even be in sync with the basic endian-ness of the target. Accessing the bit-fields through the array is even more dependent on processor and compiler.

Your only chance at writing independent code is to encapsulate the access in a set of functions, and verify on every compiler/processor combination that correct results are returned.

I had the same problems porting code from the Freescale S12X to the MPC56xx architecture, and these conversions were very tedious but unavoidable. The MPC even numbers the bits in a word in reverse direction. Go figure!

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Thanks for your comments and i see the issue. Do we have any standard functions which takes care of these bit flipping? –  gattu Nov 18 '11 at 19:42
    
For the bit flipping itself, use the normal & and | operators, but for having bits at identical places in a union, you're on your own, I guess. The problem is not the language, but the differences between processors. –  Johan Bezem Nov 20 '11 at 11:20
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This is still not portable at all, but in my case it really helped me a big lot :)

#ifdef __LITTLE_ENDIAN
#define BITFIELD2(a,b) a;b;
#elif defined(__BIG_ENDIAN)
#define BITFIELD2(a,b) b;a;
#else
#error cannot decide architecture
#endif

#define BITFIELD3(a,b,c) BITFIELD2(a,BITFIELD2(b,c))
#define BITFIELD4(a,b,c,d) BITFIELD2(a,BITFIELD3(b,c,d))
#define BITFIELD5(a,b,c,d,e) BITFIELD2(a,BITFIELD4(b,c,d,e))
#define BITFIELD6(a,b,c,d,e,f) BITFIELD2(a,BITFIELD5(b,c,d,e,f))

struct
    {
        BITFIELD6(
        uint16 A:3,
        uint16 B:3,  
        uint16 C:3,  
        uint16 D:3,  
        uint16 E:3,  
        uint16 F:1
        )
        BITFIELD5(
        uint16 G:3,
        uint16 H:3,  
        uint16 I:3,  
        uint16 J:3,  
        uint16 K:4
        )
    } Attributes;
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You should explain what's going on here. What's __LITTLE_ENDIAN? Is that standard or a macro that you use? –  Nirk Sep 18 '13 at 15:40
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