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I have an xts object that looks like this:

> q.xts
                                  val
2011-08-31 09:30:00.002357 -1.0135222
2011-08-31 09:30:00.003443 -0.2182679
2011-08-31 09:30:00.005075 -0.5317191
2011-08-31 09:30:00.009515 -1.0639535
2011-08-31 09:30:00.011569 -1.2470759
2011-08-31 09:30:00.012144  0.7678103
2011-08-31 09:30:00.023813 -0.6303432
2011-08-31 09:30:00.024107 -0.5105943

I calculate a fixed offset from timestamps in another data frame, r. The number of rows in r is significantly fewer than the number of rows in q.xts.

> r
                        time               predict.time
1 2011-08-31 09:30:00.003443 2011-08-31 09:30:00.002443
2 2011-08-31 09:30:00.009515 2011-08-31 09:30:00.008515
3 2011-08-31 09:30:00.024107 2011-08-31 09:30:00.023108

The time column corresponds to an observation from q.xts while the predict.time column is 1 millisecond earlier than time (less any precision round offs).

What I would like to do is find the last observation from q.xts that is equal to or earlier in time for each value of predict.time. For the three observations in r above I would expect the following matches:

                        time               predict.time     (time from q.xts)
1 2011-08-31 09:30:00.003443 2011-08-31 09:30:00.002443  --> 09:30:00.002357
2 2011-08-31 09:30:00.009515 2011-08-31 09:30:00.008515  --> 09:30:00.005075
3 2011-08-31 09:30:00.024107 2011-08-31 09:30:00.023108  --> 09:30:00.012144

I had approached this by looping over each row in r and performing an xts subset. So, for row 1 of r I would do:

> last(index(q.xts[paste('/', r[1,]$predict.time, sep='')]))
[1] "2011-08-31 09:30:00.002357 CDT"

QUESTION: Doing this with a loop seems clunky and awkward. Is there a better way? I would like to end up with another column in r that provides the exact time or row number for the corresponding value in q.xts.


NOTE: Use this to build the data I've used for this example:

q <- read.csv(tc <- textConnection("
       2011-08-31 09:30:00.002358, -1.01352216
       2011-08-31 09:30:00.003443, -0.21826793
       2011-08-31 09:30:00.005076, -0.53171913
       2011-08-31 09:30:00.009515, -1.06395353
       2011-08-31 09:30:00.011570, -1.24707591
       2011-08-31 09:30:00.012144,  0.76781028
       2011-08-31 09:30:00.023814, -0.63034317
       2011-08-31 09:30:00.024108, -0.51059425"),
     header=FALSE); close(tc)
colnames(q) <- c('datetime', 'val')
q.xts <- xts(q[-1], as.POSIXct(q$datetime))

r <- read.csv(tc <- textConnection("
       2011-08-31 09:30:00.003443
       2011-08-31 09:30:00.009515
       2011-08-31 09:30:00.024108"),
     header=FALSE); close(tc)
colnames(r) <- c('time')
r$time <- as.POSIXct(strptime(r$time, '%Y-%m-%d %H:%M:%OS'))
r$predict.time <- r$time - 0.001
share|improve this question
    
Once you have it, how are you going to use the "column in r that provides the exact time or row number for the corresponding value in q.xts"? –  Joshua Ulrich Nov 18 '11 at 18:32
    
I have another tool chain that constructs a feature vector from the rows. There are significantly more columns in the real q.xts than just 1. So for each row in q.xts that is matched from the timestamps in r I will construct a set of features. –  Louis Marascio Nov 18 '11 at 18:58

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

There may be a better way to do this, but this is the best I can come up with at the moment.

# create an empty xts object based on r$predict.time
r.xts <- xts(,r$predict.time)
# merge q.xts and r.xts. This will insert NAs at the times in r.xts.
tmp <- merge(q.xts,r.xts)
# Here's the magic:
# lag tmp *backwards* one period, so the NAs appear at the times
# right before the times in r.xts. Then grab the index for the NA periods
tmp.index <- index(tmp[is.na(lag(tmp,-1,na.pad=FALSE))])
# get the rows in q.xts for the times in tmp.index
out <- q.xts[tmp.index]
#                                   val
# 2011-08-31 09:30:00.002357 -1.0135222
# 2011-08-31 09:30:00.005075 -0.5317191
# 2011-08-31 09:30:00.012144  0.7678103
share|improve this answer
    
Joshua, very clever. This worked perfectly. Thanks very much. –  Louis Marascio Nov 18 '11 at 19:48

I'd use findInterval:

findInterval(r$predict.time, index(q.xts))

> q.xts[findInterval(r$predict.time, index(q.xts)),]
                           val
2011-08-31 09:30:00 -1.0135222
2011-08-31 09:30:00 -0.5317191
2011-08-31 09:30:00  0.7678103

Your times are POSIXct so this should be fairly robust.

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