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I'm building a new project off the service repository pattern detailed here. It seems to work well in the most basic of examples. In more complex scenarios is it acceptable to mix the objects in the service \ repository layers?. For example say there is a User repository and service and I want to be able to create an audit for the creation of a user, I would think this would go in the service layer.

If I follow the article the service automatically creates the user repository object in the constructor. Adding a audit would mean adding audit CRUD methods to the user repository? Does that make sense to do that?

    public UserService(IValidationDictionary validationDictionary, IUserRrepository repository)
    {
        _validatonDictionary = validationDictionary;
        _repository = repository;
    }
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possible duplicate of MVC: Repositories and Services –  jrummell Nov 18 '11 at 18:18
1  
im not completely following what you are asking here. mix which objects? Your domain objects can be touched anywhere. Since your repository should be responsible for the save, then your audit methods would go there. If you want to audit at a higher level though - there is nothing wrong with that either so Im missing a part of this I think. –  Adam Tuliper - MSFT Nov 18 '11 at 19:03
    
@AdamTuliper Most of the samples I've seen using the services \ repositories pattern tie the classes to one entity, such as user or in the article product. So I'm asking does it follow the pattern to have non User\Product in these classes? –  NullReference Nov 18 '11 at 19:12
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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

in my experience you dont need repositories for each entity type. Just create one repository for the whole model, and then use linq queries over it. EF already provides implementation of that repository, you can create a custom interface like shown below and implement it over that repository ..

  public interface IDataContext
    {
        void Add<T>(T entity) where T : BaseEntity;
        void Delete<T>(T entity) where T : BaseEntity;
        IQueryable<T> Find<T>(Expression<Func<T, bool>> where) where T : BaseEntity;
        int SaveChanges()
    }

where your base entity is your base class for all repositories.

most of the linq you would write would be pretty straighforward, but for the complicated ones, just write Utility classes

in our implementation the class derived from DbContext implements this interface, and all the auditing is done through the Save Method using the ChangeTracker

A sample implementation of EF 4.2 is below ...

 public class MyContext : DbContext, IDataContext
 {
    static MyContext ()
    {
        Database.SetInitializer<MyContext >(null);
    }

    public T GetById<T>(int id) where T : BaseEntity
    {
        return this.Set<T>().SingleOrDefault(i => i.Id == id);
    }

    public void Add<T>(T entity) where T : BaseEntity
    {
        this.Set<T>().Add(entity);
    }

    public void Delete<T>(T entity) where T : BaseEntity
    {
        this.Set<T>().Remove(entity);
    }

    public IQueryable<T> Find<T>(System.Linq.Expressions.Expression<Func<T, bool>> where) where T : BaseEntity
    {
        return this.Set<T>().Where(where);
    }

    public override int SaveChanges()
    {
        this.SetAuditValues();
        return base.SaveChanges();
    }

   private void SetAuditValues()
    {
        var addedEntries = this.ChangeTracker.Entries().Where(e => e.State ==  System.Data.EntityState.Added);
        var currentUser = this.GetCurrentUser();
        foreach (var addedEntry in addedEntries)
        {
            var entity = addedEntry.Entity as BaseEntity;
            if (entity != null)
            {
                entity.CreateDateTime = DateTime.Now;
                entity.CreateUser = currentUser;
                entity.ModDateTime = DateTime.Now;
                entity.ModUser = currentUser;
            }

        }

        var modifiedEntries = this.ChangeTracker.Entries().Where(e => e.State == System.Data.EntityState.Modified);

        foreach (var modEntry in modifiedEntries)
        {
            var entity = modEntry.Entity as BaseEntity;
            if (entity != null)
            {
                entity.ModDateTime = DateTime.Now;
                entity.ModUser = currentUser;
            }
        }
    }
}
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Thanks for the comment, very helpful. Just to clarify you're suggesting modifying the EF ObjectContext to inherit the IDataContext interface? If you have any more code snippets, or where you came up with this design that would be hugely helpful, it sounds like you're doing exactly what I'm looking for. –  NullReference Nov 18 '11 at 19:31
    
i updated the code with a sample implementation –  np-hard Nov 18 '11 at 19:40
    
Theres quite a bit of debate on including IQueryable as a return type of a method. Lots of people thing this should be avoided especially because of varying provider differences. However some think its ok, although if using linq-sql or entity framework I would be very very very cautious of this because of deferred execution. –  Adam Tuliper - MSFT Nov 18 '11 at 19:59
    
IMO generally it should be okay, deferred execution can bring problems and benefits both, but any part of application where performance demand is critical, one should always test and tweak.. –  np-hard Nov 18 '11 at 20:05
    
its not an issue of performance, its an issue of exposing an iqueryable instance whose operation depends on the underlying provider. This can cause invalid unit test results (that dont match production execution) as well as the deferred execution can downright cause errors. Just something to keep in mind, theres lots of articles on the subject - most say dont but some argue for flexibility on searches its fine. –  Adam Tuliper - MSFT Nov 18 '11 at 20:10
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You can surely have one repository/service layer handle more than one entity if it falls within the purpose or domain of that service. Generally in simple examples - you are correct, you don't see this but there is no reason you can include another entity.

Now in regards to your audit, why not just call off to your audit service layer instead of including an audit object (if thats what you meant)

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Thanks for the reply Adam. That is what I meant for audit, and your audit suggestion is what I originally thought to do but what made me stop and think is that the user service accepts an IUserRepository in it's constructor to decouple and promote testing. This allows you to pass any implementation of the IUserRepository to the service. Adding a Audit service would somewhat defeat this method of doing things because it would bind the service layer to one implementation of IAuditRepository. –  NullReference Nov 18 '11 at 20:25
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