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I am trying to find a general solution for drawing clock face like graphical objects in Mathematica. I've already implemented a version of my own, but I think a much better solution must exist. A neater version with less code or clearer thought process would be appreciated.

My version:

radius = 1;
elementList = 
  Join[Table[i, {i, 3, 1, -1}], Table[i, {i, 12, 4, -1}]];
elementNumber = Length[elementList];
thetaList = Table[i, {i, 0, 2 Pi, 2 Pi/elementNumber}][[1 ;; 12]];
coordinateList = Map[{radius*Cos[#], radius*Sin[#]} &, thetaList];
objectList = 
  Map[Style[#, FontFamily -> "Georgia", FontSize -> 30] &, 
   elementList];
Graphics[
 Join[
  MapThread[Text[#1, #2] &, {objectList, coordinateList}],
  {Circle[{0, 0}, 1.2*radius]}
  ]
 ]

enter image description here

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3  
Perhaps this would be a good starting point: blog.wolfram.com/2007/07/09/… –  Brett Champion Nov 18 '11 at 18:45
    
I think the suggestion from @BrettChampion answers this question perfectly. I feel a little ashamed about asking this (I should ask both Google and the documentation before I ask question here, and I did only the later). Should I keep this post or delete it, which choice would be better for the community? –  Ning Nov 18 '11 at 18:59
3  
I would keep your post. There are lots of interesting ways to construct clocks (and clock faces). –  Arnoud Buzing Nov 18 '11 at 20:02
2  
@Ning IMHO, as somebody who's learning Mathematica and working with it daily, I say keep it. The two answers below are interesting and I enjoy learning from seeing how other people approach these sorts of questions (i.e. two very different answers). –  programming_historian Nov 18 '11 at 20:03

5 Answers 5

up vote 11 down vote accepted

Here is one way to make a clock:

clockFace = Import["http://i.imgur.com/ufanv.jpg"];
{hour, minute, second} = Take[Date[], -3];
hour = Mod[hour, 12] + minute/60.; 
Graphics3D[
{
 {Texture[clockFace], 
      Polygon[{{-1, -1, 0}, {1, -1, 0}, {1, 1, 0}, {-1, 1, 0}},
         VertexTextureCoordinates -> {{0, 0}, {1, 0}, {1, 1}, {0, 1}}
      ]
 }, 
 {Black, AbsoluteThickness[8], 
      Line[{{0, 0, 0}, 
       .55 {Cos[Pi/2 - 2 Pi hour/12], Sin[Pi/2 - 2 Pi hour/12], 0}}
      ]
 },
 {Black, AbsoluteThickness[5], 
      Line[{{0, 0, 0}, 
       .8 {Cos[Pi/2 - 2 Pi minute/60], Sin[Pi/2 - 2 Pi minute/60], 0}}
      ]
 }
}, 
Boxed -> False, Lighting -> "Neutral"]

a clock with a nice face generated by Mathematica

Addition

Here is a rotating, spinning 3D clock for your amusement:

clockFace = Import["http://i.imgur.com/ufanv.jpg"];
vtc = VertexTextureCoordinates -> {{0, 0}, {1, 0}, {1, 1}, {0, 1}};
hand[thickness_, radius_, time_] := {AbsoluteThickness[thickness],
   Line[{{0, 0, -1}, {radius Cos[Pi/2 + 2 Pi time],
      radius Sin[Pi/2 + 2 Pi time], -1}}],
   Line[{{0, 0, 1}, {radius Cos[Pi/2 - 2 Pi time],
      radius Sin[Pi/2 - 2 Pi time], 1}}],
   Line[{{0, -1, 0}, {radius Cos[Pi/2 - 2 Pi time], -1,
      radius Sin[Pi/2 - 2 Pi time]}}],
   Line[{{0, 1, 0}, {radius Cos[Pi/2 + 2 Pi time], 1,
      radius Sin[Pi/2 + 2 Pi time]}}],
   Line[{{-1, 0, 0}, {-1, radius Cos[Pi/2 + 2 Pi time],
      radius Sin[Pi/2 + 2 Pi time]}}],
   Line[{{1, 0, 0}, {1, radius Cos[Pi/2 - 2 Pi time],
      radius Sin[Pi/2 - 2 Pi time]}}]};
Dynamic[
  {hour, minute, second} = Take[Date[], -3];
  hour = Mod[hour, 12] + minute/60.;
  Graphics3D[{
    {Texture[clockFace],
     Polygon[{{1, -1, -1}, {-1, -1, -1}, {-1, 1, -1}, {1, 1, -1}},
      vtc],
     Polygon[{{-1, -1, 1}, {1, -1, 1}, {1, 1, 1}, {-1, 1, 1}}, vtc],
     Polygon[{{-1, 1, -1}, {-1, -1, -1}, {-1, -1, 1}, {-1, 1, 1}},
      vtc], Polygon[{{1, -1, -1}, {1, 1, -1}, {1, 1, 1}, {1, -1, 1}},
      vtc], Polygon[{{-1, -1, -1}, {1, -1, -1}, {1, -1, 1}, {-1, -1,
        1}}, vtc],
     Polygon[{{1, 1, -1}, {-1, 1, -1}, {-1, 1, 1}, {1, 1, 1}}, vtc]
     }, {Black,
     hand[8, .55, hour/12],
     hand[5, .8, minute/60],
     hand[3, .8, second/60]
     }
    },
   Boxed -> False, Lighting -> "Neutral",
   ViewPoint ->
    5 {Cos[2 Pi second/60], Sin[2 Pi second/60],
      Sin[2 Pi second/30]}, SphericalRegion -> True,
Background -> Black, ImageSize -> Full]] // Deploy

3D clock

share|improve this answer
    
Perhaps you could use something like Polygon[#, vtc] & /@(PolyhedronData["Cube", "VertexCoordinates"][[#]] & /@ PolyhedronData["Cube", "FaceIndices"])] to get the faces coords –  belisarius Nov 20 '11 at 14:53
1  
@belisarius, that is a good tip, but I have to individually adjust the polygons to make the ones on the sides be upright. –  Arnoud Buzing Nov 20 '11 at 21:14
    
yep. I was wondering if that can be fixed with a permutation. I didn't try very hard, but could not find an obvious way. –  belisarius Nov 20 '11 at 21:23
    
+1 and congrats on your second "nice answer" badge –  belisarius Nov 20 '11 at 21:25

Here's a version of a function that generalizes the generation of clock face to allow you to easily change the style of the numbers, the number of "hours", and the radius of the face:

Options[clockFace] = {FontFamily -> "Georgia", FontSize -> 30};
clockFace[hours_Integer, radius_?NumericQ, opts : OptionsPattern[]] /;
   hours > 0 && Im[radius] == 0 && radius > 0 :=
 With[{range = Range[12]},
  With[{objects = 
        Style[#, 
          FilterRules[{opts}, Options[Style]] ~Join~ Options[clockFace]] & /@ range,
       thetas = Pi/2 - 2 Pi*range/hours},
  Graphics[Append[
     MapThread[Text[#1, {Cos[#2], Sin[#2]}] &, {objects, thetas}],
     Circle[radius*1.2]]]]]

Some things are just Mathematica style issues; for instance,

FilterRules[{opts}, Options[Style]] ~Join~ Options[clockFace]

is just the way to pass the relevant optional arguments to Style while making sure that clockFace's default values are used where relevant, because Mathematica will use the first applicable rule that it finds in a list of rules (and function options are just lists of rules). I also used With to name things, which is why there's that nesting; other people might prefer to use a single Module. Either way, it's always best to make things local variables whenever possible.

The biggest change, though, was generating the list of numbers in order, using Range, and then adjusting the definition of thetas so everything winds up in the right place. I think it's much easier to see what's going on, because the minus sign means you're moving around clockwise and offsetting by Pi/2 makes it clear you're starting at the top of the clock.

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The following is a working 3D clock made by easily combining @Arnoud's answer with Christopher's blog entry:

makeHand[fl_, bl_, fw_, bw_] :=
    Polygon[{{-bw, -bl, 0.1}, {bw, -bl, 0.1}, {fw, fl, 0.1}, 
             {0, fl + 8 fw, 0.1}, {-fw, fl, 0.1}}/9];

hourHand = makeHand[5, 5/3, .1, .3];
minuteHand = makeHand[7, 7/3, .1, .3];
secondHand = {Red, EdgeForm[Black], makeHand[7, 7/3, .1/2, .3/2]};
clockFace = Import["http://i.imgur.com/ufanv.jpg"];

Graphics3D[{
  {Texture[clockFace], 
   Polygon[{{-1, -1, 0}, {1, -1, 0}, {1, 1, 0}, {-1, 1, 0}}, 
    VertexTextureCoordinates -> {{0, 0}, {1, 0}, {1, 1}, {0, 1}}]},

    Rotate[hourHand, Dynamic[Refresh[-30 Mod[AbsoluteTime[]/3600, 60] \[Degree], 
     UpdateInterval -> 60]], {0, 0, 1}],
    Rotate[minuteHand, Dynamic[Refresh[-6 Mod[AbsoluteTime[]/60, 60] \[Degree], 
     UpdateInterval -> 1]], {0, 0, 1}],
    Rotate[secondHand, Dynamic[Refresh[-6 Mod[AbsoluteTime[], 60] \[Degree], 
     UpdateInterval -> 1/20]], {0, 0, 1}]}, Boxed -> False]

enter image description here

Edit

The animation was captured by using Rasterize[] inside a scheduled task!

a = Graphics3D[(* etc etc*)];
b = {};
t = CreateScheduledTask[AppendTo[b, Rasterize@a], {2, 30}];
StartScheduledTask[t];
While[MatchQ[ScheduledTasks[], {ScheduledTaskObject[_, _, _, _,True]}],Pause[1]];
RemoveScheduledTask[ScheduledTasks[]];
Export["c:\\test.gif", b, "DisplayDurations" -> 1]
share|improve this answer
    
+1, okay. that is just kind of wrong. I even downloaded v8 so I could run it. –  rcollyer Nov 18 '11 at 22:03
    
@rcollyer I am afraid I don't understand. What is wrong there? –  belisarius Nov 18 '11 at 22:08
    
sorry, colloquialism. The third definition from the urban dictionary is closest to my usage here. Specifically, I was commenting on the irony of using a very powerful tool to create an accurate clock animation. –  rcollyer Nov 19 '11 at 0:51
1  
@rcollyer Did you notice the use of ScheduledTask in the last edit? I never used it like that before! –  belisarius Nov 20 '11 at 14:12
    
No, I hadn't. Wow, and I thought the first use was absurd. This one is worse, and funnier for it. –  rcollyer Nov 20 '11 at 19:12

Mathematica has something called ClockGauge built-in. The possibilities for styling the clock face are endless, as can be seen in the documentation. The bare-bone version looks like this:

ClockGauge[]

Clock gauge

share|improve this answer
    
Please take a look a the time-stamp in the question :) –  belisarius Sep 26 '14 at 20:35
    
@belisarius Oh well, it can't hurt to have this solution here as well. –  Pickett Sep 26 '14 at 21:38
2  
I guess almost all questions about Mma in this site could be re-written since most of them are from v7 and v8 :D –  belisarius Sep 26 '14 at 21:58

Your method is fine. It is just a little messy. Here is my interpretation:

hours = 12;
radius = 1;
thetaList = Rest@Range[2 Pi, 0, -2 Pi/hours] + Pi/2;
coordinateList = radius {Cos@#, Sin@#} & /@ thetaList;
Graphics[{
  FontFamily -> "Georgia",
  FontSize -> 30,
  Text ~MapThread~ {Range@hours, coordinateList},
  Circle[{0, 0}, 1.2 radius]
}]

same output

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