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Consider the set of strings S that contains the binary representation of the numbers 0 to 99. What is the shortest string T such that every element of S is a substring of T?

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"The machine does not care about the order of your sequence": What does it care about, if not the order? Also the example doesn't seem to make any sense. –  sth May 4 '09 at 5:26
    
@sth Your sequence can be something like 101010101111010110001010000000011. If the rigth answer is 111, the machine try to match it. It is like a regex "111". –  Masi May 4 '09 at 5:30
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Do you mean "Consider the set of strings S that contains the binary representation of the numbers 0 to 99. What is the shortest string T such that every element of S is substring of T?" –  RossFabricant May 4 '09 at 5:33
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Are you asking, "What is the shortest bitstream that contains all binary numbers less than 99?"? E.g. the shortest bitstream that contains 0, 1, 2, and 3 is "110" –  Matthew Flaschen May 4 '09 at 5:36
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@Matthew Flaschen: Yes. Please, have a look at my discussion between rossfabricant. His shorter question is what I meant. I hesitated to write it as a mathematical problem. Hopefully, you can understand it. –  Masi May 4 '09 at 5:55

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What you're asking for is very similar to the binary De Bruijn sequence. The algorithm for that problem, which uses Eulerian cycles, can easily be adapted to solve your problem.

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+1 Very cool :) I was actually looking for some mathematical reprentation for it. How can you get it with computer? –  Masi May 4 '09 at 5:52
    
You'll have to learn some graph theory :) The algorithms are explained in the two pages I linked to. –  marcog May 4 '09 at 5:58
    
marcog: Great thanks! I will :) –  Masi May 4 '09 at 6:00

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