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Hi guys: I've "simplistic" workflow management tricks (like rotating file queues, controller threads, etc...) work in a wide variety of producer/consumer contexts... Where files are simply renamed, deleted, and created in a systematic manner; or where a "main" thread is calls and coordinates workers.

In contrast, I've also "played" with JMS in some toy applications, and I can see how it might be used to coordinate a complex application workflow.

I was wondering: What do messaging services like JMS offer over standard producer/consumer workflows (of course, if I'm missing something here, or have the wrong idea of when/why JMS is used, feel free to correct me)?

In particular, what type of applications require enterprise-grade messaging frameworks?

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When you say complex application workflow, I assume you mean a workflow between multiple services? – Rob Goodwin Nov 18 '11 at 20:54
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What do messaging services like JMS offer over standard producer/consumer workflows?

Scalability, availability, transparency, manageability. In point-to-point communication sender is bound to the receiver and vice versa. You, as the application developer, are responsible for thinking what to do when traffic increases and implement the necessary changes. Your application must be aware of the environment in which it works and must be changed every time the environment changes. You are forced to reinvent the wheel while solving typical messaging problems, for example, temporary congestion (what to do when the consumer can't keep the pace with the producer for a while?). You have to provide your own means of monitoring the current situation, if something does not work as expected. The list goes on...

Now imagine you have to wire 10 different systems this way. Obviously, you'll need to come up with a fairly universal solution so that you don't implement each connection logic from scratch — that would be terribly expensive to produce, not to mention maintaining it. A JMS message broker is one of such possible general solutions.

In particular, what type of applications require enterprise-grade messaging frameworks?

Complicated, in short. I work for a company that has a network of about 70 systems, some of them 30 years old. New systems are added to the network as time passes and the old systems don't need to be changed, neither must new systems be aware of ancient data exchange protocols — a centralized cluster of message brokers can translate a JMS message into some mainframe message format I have no idea about, and same way back with the answer.

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