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I have a read-only property on a class that I am testing.

    public string ReadOnlyProperty
    {
        get { return _readOnlyProperty; }
    }

Is there a way to write an NUnit test that ensures that this property is readonly? Does the fact that I want to do this at all cause you to raise your eyebrow? It seems to me that adding tests to ensure that read-only properties remain read-only unless a deliberate decision is made to change them is just as important as any other behavior.

Thanks in advance for the feedback.

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1  
You'll have to do this with reflection. –  David Heffernan Nov 18 '11 at 20:56
    
Thanks all! Reflection is not something I'm very familiar with. Appreciate the compass. –  carter Nov 18 '11 at 21:30

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

It seems to me that adding tests to ensure that read-only properties remain read-only unless a deliberate decision is made to change them is just as important as any other behavior.

I agree, but I dare say that unit testing is the wrong way. Here's why:

Unit testing is generally used to test the dynamic aspects of code, i.e. its run-time behaviour. You, on the other hand, are looking for a way to test a static (compile-time or design-time) aspect of your code. It would seem to me that tools such as FxCop or NDepend are more appropriate in this case. (I may be wrong about these particular tools being appropriate since I don't know them very well myself.)

That being said, as you've already learned from previous answers, you could do this using reflection:

typeof(SomeType).GetProperty("ReadOnlyProperty").CanWrite == false
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You should be able to use reflection (specifically PropertyInfo.GetSetMethod, which will return null if there is no set accessor defined).

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1  
PropertyInfo.CanWrite would seem even more straightforward than .GetSetMethod. –  stakx Nov 18 '11 at 21:18
    
CanWrite seems to offer a little less granularity, in that GetSetMethod allows you to specify whether you want to check for public setters or all setters. Not sure whether that additional granularity is useful in his particular situation. –  JHunz Nov 18 '11 at 21:58
    
Good point. In this case I'm only concerned about public setters. If i were unit testing a base class I may want to ensure that there is a protected setter for one reason or another. –  carter Nov 21 '11 at 14:53

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