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The signature of the jQuery function .on is

$(elements).on(events [, selector] [, data], handler);

where selector and data are optional. Therefore, the function call

$(elements).on(var1, var2, var3);

could be interpreted with var2 as either selector or as data. Is there ambiguity?

More generally, how is ambiguity from optional parameters dealt with for any other jQuery function?

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2  
+1 have often wondered this. –  jondavidjohn Nov 18 '11 at 21:21
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5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

If only one of the selector and data parameters is provided and the value is a string it is assumed to be a selector.

From the jQuery doco for .on():

The data argument can be any type, but if a string is used the selector must either be provided or explicitly passed as null so that the data is not mistaken for a selector. Best practice is to use an object (map) so that multiple values can be passed as properties.

A similar principle applies to other jQuery methods with optional parameters.

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Selector is a string and data an object. The test should be something like.

if (typeof var2 === 'string') {
   // var2 is selector
} else {
   // var2 is data
}

Edit, the actual jQuery source from https://github.com/jquery/jquery/blob/master/src/event.js

on: function( types, selector, data, fn, /*INTERNAL*/ one ) {
    var origFn, type;

    // Types can be a map of types/handlers
    if ( typeof types === "object" ) {
        // ( types-Object, selector, data )
        if ( typeof selector !== "string" ) {
            // ( types-Object, data )
            data = selector;
            selector = undefined;
        }
        for ( type in types ) {
            this.on( type, selector, data, types[ type ], one );
        }
        return this;
    }
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For the example you gave, the selector and data arguments expect different types of object. The selector argument should be a String, and data should be an Object. They can be differentiated between using the typeof operator. For example:

if(typeof selector === "string") {
    //We know that the 2nd argument is actually a selector string
}

Note that if you did need to pass a String into on as the data argument, the selector argument would have to be specified too (even if you just pass in null).

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Here's a bit of the jquery source. Basically, they're looking at the types of the parameters and assigning them to other parameters as needed. For example, if the item in the "selector" position in the parameter list is not a string, they assume it was meant to be the "data" parameter, and so forth.

on: function( types, selector, data, fn, /*INTERNAL*/ one ) {
    var origFn, type;

    // Types can be a map of types/handlers
    if ( typeof types === "object" ) {
        // ( types-Object, selector, data )
        if ( typeof selector !== "string" ) {
            // ( types-Object, data )
            data = selector;
            selector = undefined;
        }
        for ( type in types ) {
            this.on( type, selector, data, types[ type ], one );
        }
        return this;
    }

    if ( data == null && fn == null ) {
        // ( types, fn )
        fn = selector;
        data = selector = undefined;
    } else if ( fn == null ) {
        if ( typeof selector === "string" ) {
            // ( types, selector, fn )
            fn = data;
            data = undefined;
        } else {
            // ( types, data, fn )
            fn = data;
            data = selector;
            selector = undefined;
        }
    }
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I have my own qualms with .on() as well...

The context of this was always very clear with delegate vs bind (or any shortcut of bind). Now with on, the context can change very suddenly...

For instance,

//This is pretty clear, you now want to turn the paragraph tag red when clicked
$('p').on('click', function () {
   $(this).css('color', 'red');
});

//Woah... so the context of `this` just changed by a single argument
//this now refers to all anchor tags that are descendants of paragraph tags.
$('p').on('click', 'a', function () {
   $(this).css('color', 'red');
});

This is the FIRST jQuery method ever to change the context of this just by passing a different argument.

Quick fact - delegate - (in 1.4.2) was the first method to not use the selector to represent the context to the callback function. But at least it was still clear... when you see .delegate() you understand what is happening.

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this applies to the element specified, like you said - the a element in your second example. why is that such a surprise? In any case this is completely off-topic. –  nnnnnn Nov 18 '11 at 21:37
    
@nnnnnn ambiguity of on() is off-topic? –  John Strickler Nov 20 '11 at 4:45
    
Yes. The question is about how optional parameters are interpreted, for on() specifically and other jQuery functions in general. The point you raise about on() is worth discussing on its own, but doesn't relate to how jQuery resolves optional parameters. (Don't worry, I didn't downvote or anything.) –  nnnnnn Nov 20 '11 at 6:08
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