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Note: I am aware of the Iterator#remove() method.

In the following code sample, I don't understand why the List.remove in main method throws ConcurrentModificationException but not in the remove method.

public class RemoveListElementDemo {    
    private static final List<Integer> integerList;

    static {
        integerList = new ArrayList<Integer>();
        integerList.add(1);
        integerList.add(2);
        integerList.add(3);
    }

    public static void remove(Integer remove) {
        for(Integer integer : integerList) {
            if(integer.equals(remove)) {                
                integerList.remove(integer);
            }
        }
    }

    public static void main(String... args) {                
        remove(Integer.valueOf(2));

        Integer remove = Integer.valueOf(3);
        for(Integer integer : integerList) {
            if(integer.equals(remove)) {                
                integerList.remove(integer);
            }
        }
    }
}

Thanks for the explanation!

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2  
The only safe way to remove an element from a list while iterating over that list is to use Iterator#remove(). Why are you doing it this way? –  Matt Ball Nov 18 '11 at 21:37
    
@MattBall: I was just trying to see what the reason here could be. Because, it's the same "enhanced for loop" in both the methods but one throws the ConcurrentModificationException and the other doesn't. –  Bhesh Gurung Nov 18 '11 at 21:44
    
There is a difference in the element you remove.In the method your remove the 'middle element'. In the main you remove the last. If you swap the numbers you get the exception in your method. Still not sure why that is though. –  Ben van Gompel Nov 18 '11 at 22:11

7 Answers 7

up vote 114 down vote accepted

Here's why: As it is says in the Javadoc:

The iterators returned by this class's iterator and listIterator methods are fail-fast: if the list is structurally modified at any time after the iterator is created, in any way except through the iterator's own remove or add methods, the iterator will throw a ConcurrentModificationException.

This check is done in the next() method of the iterator (as you can see by the stacktrace). But we will reach the next() method only if hasNext() delivered true, which is what is called by the for each to check if the boundary is met. In your remove method, when hasNext() checks if it needs to return another element, it will see that it returned two elements, and now after one element was removed the list only contains two elements. So all is peachy and we are done with iterating. The check for concurrent modifications does not occur, as this is done in the next() method which is never called.

Next we get to the second loop. After we remove the second number the hasNext method will check again if can return more values. It has returned two values already, but the list now only contains one. But the code here is:

public boolean hasNext() {
        return cursor != size();
}

1 != 2, so we continue to the next() method, which now realizes that someone has been messing with the list and fires the exception.

Hope that clears your question up.

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Correct explanation! –  vasquez Nov 19 '11 at 6:55
2  
@pushy: Only answer that seem to answer what the question is actually asking, and the explanation is good. I am accepting this answer and also +1. Thanks. –  Bhesh Gurung Nov 21 '11 at 15:30
    
Good explanation...hic! –  MalsR Dec 21 '12 at 11:47
    
Good Explanation –  Shree Jul 27 at 10:33

One way to handle it it to remove something from a copy of a Collection (not Collection itself), if applicable. Clone the original collection it to make a copy via a Constructor.

This exception may be thrown by methods that have detected concurrent modification of an object when such modification is not permissible.

For your specific case, first off, i don't think final is a way to go considering you intend to modify the list past declaration

private static final List<Integer> integerList;

Also consider modifying a copy instead of the original list.

List<Integer> copy = new ArrayList<Integer>(integerList);

for(Integer integer : integerList) {
    if(integer.equals(remove)) {                
        copy.remove(integer);
    }
}
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+1 : for copy... –  Fahim Parkar May 22 at 22:27

This snippet will always throw a ConcurrentModificationException.

The rule is "You may not modify (add or remove elements from the list) while iterating over it using an Iterator (which happens when you use a for-each loop)".

JavaDocs:

The iterators returned by this class's iterator and listIterator methods are fail-fast: if the list is structurally modified at any time after the iterator is created, in any way except through the iterator's own remove or add methods, the iterator will throw a ConcurrentModificationException.

Hence if you want to modify the list (or any collection in general), use iterator, because then it is aware of the modifications and hence those will be handled properly.

Hope this helps.

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3  
The OP clearly states that one of the loops does NOT throw an exception and the interrogant was why that happened. –  madth3 Nov 19 '11 at 0:19
    
what do you mean by 'interrogant'? –  Bhushan Nov 19 '11 at 5:34

The forward/iterator method does not work when removing items. You can remove the element without error, but you will get a runtime error when you try to access removed items. You can't use the iterator because as pushy shows it will cause a ConcurrentModificationException, so use a regular for loop instead, but step backwards through it.

List<Integer> integerList;
integerList = new ArrayList<Integer>();
integerList.add(1);
integerList.add(2);
integerList.add(3);

int size= integerList.size();

//Item to remove
Integer remove = Integer.valueOf(3);

A solution:

Traverse the array in reverse order if you are going to remove a list element. Simply by going backwards through the list you avoid visiting an item that has been removed, which removes the exception.

//To remove items from the list, start from the end and go backwards through the arrayList
//This way if we remove one from the beginning as we go through, then we will avoid getting a runtime error
//for java.lang.IndexOutOfBoundsException or java.util.ConcurrentModificationException as when we used the iterator
for (int i=size-1; i> -1; i--) {
    if (integerList.get(i).equals(remove) ) {
        integerList.remove(i);
    }
}
share|improve this answer

I had that same problem but in case that I was adding en element into iterated list. I made it this way

public static void remove(Integer remove) {
    for(int i=0; i<integerList.size(); i++) {
        //here is maybe fine to deal with integerList.get(i)==null
        if(integerList.get(i).equals(remove)) {                
            integerList.remove(i);
        }
    }
}

Now everything goes fine because you don't create any iterator over your list, you iterate over it "manually". And condition i

Hope it helps, for me that was solution.

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This runs fine on Java 1.6

~ % javac RemoveListElementDemo.java
~ % java RemoveListElementDemo
~ % cat RemoveListElementDemo.java

import java.util.*;
public class RemoveListElementDemo {    
    private static final List<Integer> integerList;

    static {
        integerList = new ArrayList<Integer>();
        integerList.add(1);
        integerList.add(2);
        integerList.add(3);
    }

    public static void remove(Integer remove) {
        for(Integer integer : integerList) {
            if(integer.equals(remove)) {                
                integerList.remove(integer);
            }
        }
    }

    public static void main(String... args) {                
        remove(Integer.valueOf(2));

        Integer remove = Integer.valueOf(3);
        for(Integer integer : integerList) {
            if(integer.equals(remove)) {                
                integerList.remove(integer);
            }
        }
    }
}

~ %

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1  
It's a RuntimeException :). –  Bhesh Gurung Jul 12 '12 at 17:04
    
Sorry about the typo This 'runs' fine on Java 1.6 –  battosai Jul 12 '12 at 18:06
    
Hmm... May be you have a different implementation. But according to the specification it's supposed to do that, IMO. Look at @Pushy's answer. –  Bhesh Gurung Jul 12 '12 at 23:10

Check your code man....

In the main method you are trying to remove the 4th element which is not there and hence the error. In the remove() method you are trying to remove the 3rd element which is there and hence no error.

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protected by Bhesh Gurung May 11 at 13:44

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