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I was trying to learn about different states of objects in Hibernate. I tried the following and could not find an explanation to the behavior shown. Can anyone help?

Here is what I am trying to do: Insert a new record in Employee table (empId being primary key). In the same transaction, update the newly added record (using a query, modifying empName). Then when I am checking empName property of the persistent object it continues to show the old empName value. Being a persistent object, I expected it to reflect the change made in the database. I could not understand why it didn't. (My hibernate config file has everything set to default except for "hibernate.hbm2ddl.auto" property set as update) However, after doing update, when I set the empName of the persistent object with value returned by getEmpName (which displays as the old empName value by sysout), the final data in the table shows the new empName value (i.e the one I updated using hql). Please refer to the code for this:

Transaction tx = session.getTransaction();
    tx.begin();

    Employee e1 = new Employee();
    e1.setEmpId(1);
    e1.setEmpName("Jack");
    e1.setEmpAge(25);
    session.save(e1);
    System.out.println("before: "+e1.getEmpName()); //prints Jack
    session.createQuery("update Employee set empName = \'Jack_new\' where id=1").executeUpdate();
    System.out.println("after: "+e1.getEmpName()); //prints Jack
    e1.setEmpName(e1.getEmpName()); //should update database
    tx.commit(); //sets empName value to Jack_new, as seen in table
    System.out.println("last: "+e1.getEmpName()); //prints Jack
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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

From the hibernate documentation:

Manipulating data directly in the database (using the SQL Data Manipulation Language (DML) the statements: INSERT, UPDATE, DELETE) will not affect in-memory state.

As you use the following direct DML to update,

session.createQuery("update Employee set empName = \'Jack_new\' where id=1").executeUpdate();

it will bypasses the Hibernate persistence context (and all caches). So ,although the empName is update to Jack_new in the DB actually , its instance in the persistence context still keeps the old value .

You can use session.refresh(e1); to re-read the values for the e1 from the underlying database such that e1.empName will be refreshed to Jack_new.

Normally , we don't manually write the UPDATE statements to perform update .Just set the updated values to the properties of the persisted instances. During flushing , hibernate will do the dirty check , generate and issue the corresponding update SQL automatically to update those dirty instances.


(Reply to the comment):

However, just before doing tx.commit() I am setting e1.empName to old value (that is value returned by e1.getEmpName()).Still the final value seen in the database is the new value.?

/**e1 become persisted after save()**/
 session.save(e1);

/**e1.empName is updated to new value in the DB , but as the direct DML
 will not affect in-memory state , e1.empName in the java side 
 still keeps the old value***/
 session.createQuery("update Employee set empName = \'Jack_new\' where id=1").executeUpdate();

/** As you only set `e1.empName` to its original value , the values of `e1` do 
not have any changes. Thus , during the flushing (which occurs at the moment 
before `commit()`) , hibernate will consider  that `e1` is not dirty  and 
hence no update SQL will be generated and issued to update e1 . 
***/
e1.setEmpName(e1.getEmpName()); 

So , the outcome is that Jack_new is saved in the DB.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your comments Dmitry and Ken. Helped me understand most of the issue. However, just before doing tx.commit() I am setting e1.empName to old value (that is value returned by e1.getEmpName()).Still the final value seen in the database is the new value.? –  Leo Nov 19 '11 at 8:12
    
You are welcome , see my updated plz –  Ken Chan Nov 19 '11 at 8:42
    
Thanks Ken. That makes everything crystal clear. –  Leo Nov 19 '11 at 13:02

you are executing a direct query against the database changing a field's value behind hibernate's back. When you do this, you object will not magically changed it's saved value, which is the original name. So when you do "e1.setEmpName(e1.getEmpName());" you are setting the name back to the original value.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. However, just before doing tx.commit() I am setting e1.empName to old value (that is value returned by e1.getEmpName()).Still the final value seen in the database is the new value.? –  Leo Nov 19 '11 at 8:14

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