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I'm having a problem setting active states through CSS. It works if I use body, but because I'm using django, I use templates so it's impractical to have in every page.

I'm trying to use a div instead, but simply using the same method on div tags doesn't seem to work, any idea why?

Does it have anything to do with Django?

Why does this work:

body#home a#homeNav,
body#profile a#profileNav,
body#settings_account a#settingsNav,
body#settings_profile a#settingsNav,
#login a#loginNav{
    color:white;
}

-

{% extends "base_pages/base.html" %}
{% block content %}
    <body id="home">
    </div>
{% endblock %}

But this not?

div#home a#homeNav,
div#profile a#profileNav,
div#settings_account a#settingsNav,
div#settings_profile a#settingsNav,
#login a#loginNav{
    color:white;
    border-top: 3px solid #09F;
}

-

{% extends "base_pages/base.html" %}
{% block content %}
    <div id="home">
    </div>
{% endblock %}
share|improve this question
    
Avoid overspecifying your CSS selectors. Instead of using div#home, try using #home. Instead of a#homeNav, use #homeNav. Better still, give your nav links a common class or ancestor - nav a or a.nav. Anyway, without knowing what the base_pages/base.html template has, it's impossible to help properly. Better still, provide the HTML output. –  Chris Morgan Nov 18 '11 at 22:14
3  
FWIW: I usually do something like <body class="{% block body_class %}{% endblock %}">. Which then allows you to set the class easily in any template. You can even accommodate inheritance, when you set it: {% block body_class %}{{ block.super }} additional_class{% endblock %} –  Chris Pratt Nov 18 '11 at 22:15
    
As with almost any question regarding rendered templates, this is very hard to answer without seeing rendered code, rather than template code. If you're having a problem with CSS, the problem is almost never related to the backend - it's always related to the rendered HTML, and usually the reason you can't see it is that you haven't thought to look there. Show us the rendered HTML and we can answer the question. –  nrabinowitz Nov 18 '11 at 22:19
    
Thanks Chris, that solved it. Thanks for the help guys –  arooo Nov 18 '11 at 22:30
    
@incarna Please don't mark your question "Solved" in the title. Rather, the etiquette is to accept the answer that solved your problem or, where the problem was solved by comments as is the case here, post an answer yourself summarising what you did to solve your issue, and accept that. –  razlebe Nov 23 '11 at 18:39

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

"FWIW: I usually do something like

<body class="{% block body_class %}{% endblock %}">. 

Which then allows you to set the class easily in any template. You can even accommodate inheritance, when you set it:

{% block body_class %}{{ block.super }} additional_class{% endblock %}

– Chris Pratt"

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