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is there a way to get mouse wheel events (not talking about scroll events) in jquery? I couldn't find anything in the docs.

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1  
A quick search turned up this plugin that may help. –  Jerad Rose Nov 18 '11 at 22:20
    
This solution works for me : stackoverflow.com/questions/7154967/jquery-detect-scrolldown –  bertie Mar 6 at 12:07
    
@thejh posted a new answer on this with DOM3 events: stackoverflow.com/a/24707712/2256325 –  Sergio Jul 14 at 13:00

8 Answers 8

up vote 24 down vote accepted

There's a plugin that detects up/down mouse wheel and velocity over a region.

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Ah, thanks, tried it, it does exactly what I want it to do! Thanks :) –  thejh Nov 18 '11 at 22:36
    
i want to activate this after scrolling down to the end of page, so any idea? –  Mirage Apr 10 '13 at 8:31
3  
plugin? come on .. check the answer below you can do it without –  gallery guy Oct 13 '13 at 15:41
4  
no need for plugin jsfiddle.net/CvCc6/6 –  thenewseattle Nov 27 '13 at 0:01
2  
Except that your no-plugin version doesnt work in newest FF. –  Eirinn May 23 at 9:35
​$(document).ready(function(){
    $('#foo').bind('mousewheel', function(e){
        if(e.originalEvent.wheelDelta /120 > 0) {
            $(this).text('scrolling up !');
        }
        else{
            $(this).text('scrolling down !');
        }
    });
});
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21  
The DOMMouseScroll event is used in FF, so you have to to listen on both .bind('DOMMouseScroll mousewheel') { evetns developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/DOM/DOM_event_reference/… –  mrzmyr Apr 7 '13 at 10:26
5  
e.originalEvent.wheelDelta is undefined in FF23 –  hofnarwillie Sep 10 '13 at 10:44
5  
You don't need to divide by 120 it is useless waste of cpu –  venimus Sep 30 '13 at 11:21
5  
must have been best answer –  gallery guy Oct 13 '13 at 15:43

Binding to both mousewheel and DOMMouseScroll ended up working really well for me:

$(window).bind('mousewheel DOMMouseScroll', function(event){
    if (event.originalEvent.wheelDelta > 0 || event.originalEvent.detail < 0) {
        // scroll up
    }
    else {
        // scroll down
    }
});

This method is working in IE9+, Chrome 33, and Firefox 27.

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This worked the best for me. However, this script runs per "click" of the scroll wheel. This can be overwhelming for some scripts to use. Is there a way to treat each scroll event as one instance, instead of run the script per scroll wheel click? –  invot May 28 at 17:15
    
Not especially. From what I've seen, many people will either avoid dealing with scroll tracking, or they'll use a timer instead (e.g. check the user's position on the page every x milliseconds, etc). If there's a more performant solution out there, I definitely want to know about it! –  Jesse Dupuy Aug 7 at 23:48
1  
I found a way to do this: stackoverflow.com/questions/23919035/… –  invot Aug 7 at 23:58

Answers talking about "mousewheel" event are refering to a deprecated event. The standard event is simply "wheel". See https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/Reference/Events/wheel

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16  
I tried these and found: "wheel" works in Firefox and IE but not Chrome. "mousewheel" works in Chrome and IE but not Firefox. "DOMMouseScroll" works only in Firefox. –  Curtis Yallop Aug 22 '13 at 20:39
1  
Whoa, this saved me a lot of time. Thanks! –  gustavohenke Nov 20 '13 at 17:17
    
Looks like Chrome added support for "wheel" in August of 2013: code.google.com/p/chromium/issues/detail?id=227454 –  rstackhouse Jul 7 at 14:11
    
Safari still doesn't support the wheel event. –  Thayne Sep 11 at 16:11

This worked for me:)

 //Firefox
 $('#elem').bind('DOMMouseScroll', function(e){
     if(e.originalEvent.detail > 0) {
         //scroll down
         console.log('Down');
     }else {
         //scroll up
         console.log('Up');
     }

     //prevent page fom scrolling
     return false;
 });

 //IE, Opera, Safari
 $('#elem').bind('mousewheel', function(e){
     if(e.originalEvent.wheelDelta < 0) {
         //scroll down
         console.log('Down');
     }else {
         //scroll up
         console.log('Up');
     }

     //prevent page fom scrolling
     return false;
 });

from stackoverflow

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Here is a vanilla solution. Can be used in jQuery if the event passed to the function is event.originalEvent which jQuery makes available as property of the jQuery event. Or if inside the callback function under we add before first line: event = event.originalEvent;.

This code normalizes the wheel speed/amount and is positive for what would be a forward scroll in a typical mouse, and negative in a backward mouse wheel movement.

Demo: http://jsfiddle.net/BXhzD/

var wheel = document.getElementById('wheel');

function report(ammout) {
    wheel.innerHTML = 'wheel ammout: ' + ammout;
}

function callback(event) {
    var normalized;
    if (event.wheelDelta) {
        normalized = (event.wheelDelta % 120 - 0) == -0 ? event.wheelDelta / 120 : event.wheelDelta / 12;
    } else {
        var rawAmmount = event.deltaY ? event.deltaY : event.detail;
        normalized = -(rawAmmount % 3 ? rawAmmount * 10 : rawAmmount / 3);
    }
    report(normalized);
}

var event = 'onwheel' in document ? 'wheel' : 'onmousewheel' in document ? 'mousewheel' : 'DOMMouseScroll';
window.addEventListener(event, callback);

There is also a plugin for jQuery, which is more verbose in the code and some extra sugar: https://github.com/brandonaaron/jquery-mousewheel

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1  
This is fantastic! Thank you –  yuvi Jul 14 at 12:57

my combination looks like this. it fades out and fades in on each scroll down/up. otherwise you have to scroll up to the header, for fading the header in.

var header = $("#header");
$('#content-container').bind('mousewheel', function(e){
    if(e.originalEvent.wheelDelta > 0) {
        if (header.data('faded')) {
            header.data('faded', 0).stop(true).fadeTo(800, 1);
        }
    }
    else{
        if (!header.data('faded')) header.data('faded', 1).stop(true).fadeTo(800, 0);
    }
});

the above one is not optimized for touch/mobile, I think this one does it better for all mobile:

var iScrollPos = 0;
var header = $("#header");
$('#content-container').scroll(function () {

    var iCurScrollPos = $(this).scrollTop();
    if (iCurScrollPos > iScrollPos) {
        if (!header.data('faded')) header.data('faded', 1).stop(true).fadeTo(800, 0);

    } else {
        //Scrolling Up
        if (header.data('faded')) {
            header.data('faded', 0).stop(true).fadeTo(800, 1);
        }
    }
    iScrollPos = iCurScrollPos;

});
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I got same problem recently where $(window).mousewheel was returning undefined

What I did was $(window).on('mousewheel', function() {});

Further to process it I am using:

function (event) {
    var direction = null,
        key;

    if (event.type === 'mousewheel') {
        if (yourFunctionForGetMouseWheelDirection(event) > 0) {
            direction = 'up';
        } else {
            direction = 'down';
        }
    }
}
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You did not say what has newUtilities.getMouseWheelDirection –  ccsakuweb Jun 29 at 19:39
    
It's out of scope of this question. SO it's not copy paste website. –  Ultra Jul 1 at 7:47

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