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I have a javascript class that looks like this:

function xyPoint(x, y)
{
    this. x = x;
    this.y = y;

    this.hasX = function()
    {
        return (this.x != null);
    }

    this.dumbFunction = function()
    {
        if (this.hasX())
            //do something
    }
}

How do I get this this.hasX() to execute? It does not seem to work.

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1  
What do you mean "It does not seem to work."? Is it not returning what you expect or is it not being called? How are you instantiating an xyPoint object? How are you debugging this? –  Zero21xxx Nov 18 '11 at 22:21
1  
Cannot replicate: jsfiddle.net/nrabinowitz/2uMes –  nrabinowitz Nov 18 '11 at 22:23
    
There are no classes in JavaScript. What you have there is a function. –  P.Brian.Mackey Nov 18 '11 at 22:31
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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Using that pattern will eat memory like candy, you are creating a new closure every time you instantiate xyPoint.. Don't define any functions inside the constructor. Use the prototype object so they are only defined once:

function xyPoint(x, y)
{
    this. x = x;
    this.y = y;

}

xyPoint.prototype = {

    constructor: xyPoint,

    hasX: function(){
    return (this.x != null);
    },

    dumbFunction: function(){

        if (this.hasX())
        //do something

    }

};

Now that the important thing has been said... you would use it like this (both versions):

var a = new xyPoint( 1,2 );
a.hasX() //true
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new xyPoint(1,1).hasX(); // true
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