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I want to achieve the following use the following command to add a column to an existing table:

   ALTER TABLE foo ADD COLUMN bar AFTER COLUMN old_column;

Can this option take substantially longer than the same command without the AFTER COLUMN option, as follows?

   ALTER TABLE foo ADD COLUMN bar;

Will the first command use a greater amount of tmp table space during execution to perform the action?

Context: I have a very large table (think over a billion rows) and I want to add an additional column using the AFTER COLUMN option, but I don't want to be penalized too much.

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is the table read constantly? is it a merge table? – Book Of Zeus Nov 18 '11 at 23:47
    
It's a regular table. There are no issues with reading the data. – Drew Nov 21 '11 at 21:47
    
is this tables use in a lots of mysql procedures? php codes? (or other code)? – Book Of Zeus Nov 21 '11 at 23:50
1  
You'd get more CPU usage since records would have to be shifted. From the memory usage point of view - it'd be the same with AFTER COLUMN option and without it. In most cases, a tmp table is created. There are MySQL engines that support hot schema changes (TokuDB being one) that don't create the tmp table and waste tons of resources. However, if you're doing this with MyISAM or InnoDB - I'd say that "AFTER COLUMN" option will take slightly more time due to record shifting. – N.B. Nov 22 '11 at 11:46
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@Drew ; in rare cases, the position to which you are adding your new column can sometimes affect the amount of time needed for such commands to finish..But.. By Does it use a different amount of (or any for that matter) tmp table space to perform the action?, would you happen to mean using the approach @BookOfZeus provided? – Nonym Nov 22 '11 at 11:48

Here's what I would do:

CREATE TABLE newtable LIKE oldtable;
ALTER TABLE newtable ADD COLUMN columnname INT(10) UNSIGNED NOT NULL DEFAULT 0; 

I don't know the type of your column. I give an example with INT. Now here you can specify WHERE you want to add this new column. By default it will add it at the end unless you specify the AFTER keyword, if you provide it, you will have to specify in the order you will insert otherwise you need to put it at the end.

INSERT INTO newtable SELECT field1, field2, field3 /*etc...*/, newcolumn = 0 FROM oldtable; 

OR, if you added it between columns:

# eg: ALTER TABLE newtable ADD COLUMN columnname INT(10) UNSIGNED  NULL AFTER field2; 
INSERT INTO newtable SELECT field1, field2, newcolumn = 0, field3 /*etc...*/ FROM oldtable; 

You can add a where clause if you want to do them in batch.

Once all the records are there

DROP TABLE oldtable;
RENAME TABLE newtable to oldtable;
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sorry you are right, i updated my anwer – Book Of Zeus Nov 22 '11 at 10:55
1  
This would be a good alternative solution. Just to share: For anyone taking this approach for their very large tables, please also check for any columns in the affected table that are being used as foreign keys in other tables. You'll have to reset those as well.. – Nonym Nov 22 '11 at 11:40
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I don't see how this is that different from the way MySQL internally does it as described here (dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.0/en/alter-table-problems.html). Well, it's different that you don't do the renaming steps. Also, this approach doesn't take into account tables that have foreign keys on oldtable, so you won't be able to drop the oldtable if they did exist. With the question, I don't think the answer should assume none exist. – mangoDrunk Nov 30 '11 at 23:09
8  
you can always alter a table directly, but i'll give you an example i had to deal with 2 months ago. I had a table with 325,000,000+ records. We had to add 2 columns + 1 index. so altering that table was very long (because we had to optimize it) and that table was read twice a day for statistics. Simply just altered the table and pray it worked? We opted for this solution. – Book Of Zeus Dec 1 '11 at 1:14

Create another table and alter the new table. ( like Book Of Zeus did )

And using ALTER TABLE newtable DISABLE KEYS and ALTER TABLE newtable ENABLE KEYS before and after the inserting query can make it faster. ( like below )

CREATE TABLE newtable ....;
ALTER TABLE newtable ....;

ALTER TABLE newtable DISABLE KEYS;
INSERT INTO newtable ....;
ALTER TABLE newtable ENABLE KEYS;

DROP TABLE oldtable;
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2  
if you do this, don't forget to optimize your table after all your inserts – Book Of Zeus Nov 22 '11 at 11:47
    
@BookOfZeus What is the purpose of 'optimize table' at this point? – lqez Nov 22 '11 at 11:54
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I can't explained it better than this: dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.1/en/optimize-table.html – Book Of Zeus Nov 22 '11 at 23:52
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ENABLE/DISABLE keys only works on MyIsam. On InnoDB you have to drop the keys and add them again. Optimize table can be run before adding the keys back. Source: mysqlperformanceblog.com/2010/12/09/… – Guillaume Perrot Jul 20 '12 at 8:23
up vote -1 down vote accepted

While the other answers are useful as examples of the syntax required to add columns to a table, the answer to the actual question was provided by N.B.:


You'd get more CPU usage since records would have to be shifted.

From the memory usage point of view - it'd be the same with AFTER COLUMN option and without it.

In most cases, a tmp table is created. There are MySQL engines that support hot schema changes (TokuDB being one) that don't create the tmp table and waste tons of resources.

However, if you're doing this with MyISAM or InnoDB - I'd say that "AFTER COLUMN" option will take slightly more time due to record shifting.

– N.B.

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