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I am writing a very performance intense program and have been using C, but somebody told me how cool functional programming is, so I've decided to rewrite it in F#.

Anyway, the particular function I am having a hard replicating the algorithm in F# is Duff's device. Instead of the typical iteration, it unwinds the loop so it can copy 8 bytes per iteration instead of just one.

void copy_memory( char* to, char* from, size_t count ) {
    size_t n = (count+7)/8;
    switch( count%8 ) {
    case 0: do{ *to++ = *from++;
    case 7:     *to++ = *from++;
    case 6:     *to++ = *from++;
    case 5:     *to++ = *from++;
    case 4:     *to++ = *from++;
    case 3:     *to++ = *from++;
    case 2:     *to++ = *from++;
    case 1:     *to++ = *from++;
            }while(--n>0);
    }
}

This takes advantage of case fallthrough and the ability to jump to the middle of a loop in C, which, as far as I can tell, are unfortunately features that F# seems to be missing.

I read some stuff on MSDN, and figured that F#'s match feature would be the closest I could get to C's switch. So, I started to write this bit of code

open System.Reflection
let copyMemory (pTo : Pointer) (pFrom : Pointer) length =
    let n = (length + 7) / 8
    match n % 8 with
    | 0 ->

and then I couldn't figure out what to do. It wouldn't let me start a loop here and end it in another case.

Is there something in F# that I can use to do case fall-through and jump into the middle of a loop? If you can do that for me, I think I can figure out the rest myself.

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Good luck with that... I'd think you'll have to emit the IL code directly ;) –  fmr Nov 18 '11 at 23:28
3  
Duff's device doesn't make sense in a functional language -- or on any modern compiler, since they will optimize like this for you if it makes sense. –  Brendan Long Nov 18 '11 at 23:47
    
I realized my second effort was buggy, so I replaced it with a more faithful translation of Duff's. –  Daniel Nov 20 '11 at 5:38

2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Here's the idiomatic way to fiddle memory in F# :-)

#nowarn "9" //stop telling me I'm going to break something
open Microsoft.FSharp.NativeInterop

let inline (~+) ptr = NativePtr.add ptr 1

let rec copyMemory src dest = function
  | 0 -> ()
  | n -> 
    NativePtr.read src |> NativePtr.write dest
    copyMemory +src +dest (n - 1)

But this is probably more in the spirit of Duff's

let inline (+>) s d = 
  NativePtr.read !s |> NativePtr.write !d
  s:= NativePtr.add !s 1
  d:= NativePtr.add !d 1

let copyMemory src dst count =
  let n = ref ((count + 7) / 8)
  let s, d = ref src, ref dst
  let 
    rec case_0() = s +> d; case_7()
    and case_7() = s +> d; case_6()
    and case_6() = s +> d; case_5()
    and case_5() = s +> d; case_4()
    and case_4() = s +> d; case_3()
    and case_3() = s +> d; case_2()
    and case_2() = s +> d; case_1()
    and case_1() = s +> d; decr n; if !n > 0 then case_0()
  match count % 8 with
  | 7 -> case_7() | 6 -> case_6()
  | 5 -> case_5() | 4 -> case_4()
  | 3 -> case_3() | 2 -> case_2()
  | 1 -> case_1() | _ -> case_0()

But seriously

System.Buffer.BlockCopy(src, 0, dest, 0, count)
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There are no labels in F#. You can however unroll your loop another way.

let copy (dst : nativeptr<byte>) (src : nativeptr<byte>) count =
    let mutable s = src
    let mutable d = dst

    for n in 1 .. count / 8 do
        NativePtr.read s |> NativePtr.write d
        s <- NativePtr.ofNativeInt(NativePtr.toNativeInt s + nativeint 1)
        d <- NativePtr.ofNativeInt(NativePtr.toNativeInt d + nativeint 1)
        NativePtr.read s |> NativePtr.write d
        s <- NativePtr.ofNativeInt(NativePtr.toNativeInt s + nativeint 1)
        d <- NativePtr.ofNativeInt(NativePtr.toNativeInt d + nativeint 1)
        NativePtr.read s |> NativePtr.write d
        s <- NativePtr.ofNativeInt(NativePtr.toNativeInt s + nativeint 1)
        d <- NativePtr.ofNativeInt(NativePtr.toNativeInt d + nativeint 1)
        NativePtr.read s |> NativePtr.write d
        s <- NativePtr.ofNativeInt(NativePtr.toNativeInt s + nativeint 1)
        d <- NativePtr.ofNativeInt(NativePtr.toNativeInt d + nativeint 1)
        NativePtr.read s |> NativePtr.write d
        s <- NativePtr.ofNativeInt(NativePtr.toNativeInt s + nativeint 1)
        d <- NativePtr.ofNativeInt(NativePtr.toNativeInt d + nativeint 1)
        NativePtr.read s |> NativePtr.write d
        s <- NativePtr.ofNativeInt(NativePtr.toNativeInt s + nativeint 1)
        d <- NativePtr.ofNativeInt(NativePtr.toNativeInt d + nativeint 1)
        NativePtr.read s |> NativePtr.write d
        s <- NativePtr.ofNativeInt(NativePtr.toNativeInt s + nativeint 1)
        d <- NativePtr.ofNativeInt(NativePtr.toNativeInt d + nativeint 1)
        NativePtr.read s |> NativePtr.write d
        s <- NativePtr.ofNativeInt(NativePtr.toNativeInt s + nativeint 1)
        d <- NativePtr.ofNativeInt(NativePtr.toNativeInt d + nativeint 1)

    for n in 1 .. count % 8 do
        NativePtr.read s |> NativePtr.write d
        s <- NativePtr.ofNativeInt(NativePtr.toNativeInt s + nativeint 1)
        d <- NativePtr.ofNativeInt(NativePtr.toNativeInt d + nativeint 1)

On a related note, NativePtr.add will call sizeof on nativeptr so I casted to nativeint above.

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