Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a doubt.

I opened the kernel and I changed the directory linux-3.1.1/fs/open.c

I changed the follow code in the open.c.

SYSCALL_DEFINE3(open, const char __user *, filename, int, flags, int, mode)
{
    long ret;
    printk(KERN_EMERG "Testing\n");
    ... 
}

I put this line only: printk(KERN_EMERG "Testing");

And I include the libraries:<linux/kernel.h> and <linux/printk.h>

So I compiled and rebooted my linux(Ubuntu). During the rebooting appeared a lot of "Testing" on the screen. So up to now its Ok.


But now I have a problem. I created this program in c.

int main()
{
    size_t filedesc = open("testefile2.txt",O_CREAT | O_WRONLY,0640);
    printf("%d",filedesc);
}

I compiled this program and executed and works good. But I don´t understand why the "Testing" didn't appeared on the shell. I mean , if when I reboot the pc appeared a lot of the word "Testing" , why this word doens´t appear when I execute the program above. Just to add I include this libraries in this code above:

unistd.h , fcntl.h , stdio.h , stdlib.h

Thank you guys.

share|improve this question
    
I tried fixing the formatting on this, but it seems I made it worse. Anyone see where it's screwed up? I don't see anything wrong with the way the code blocks are formatted... :( –  Tim Coker Nov 18 '11 at 23:54
    
I think its better now.Sorry,I didnt know how to use this format correctly.Thank you. –  UserJ Nov 18 '11 at 23:56
    
No worries. Welcome to SO! –  Tim Coker Nov 19 '11 at 0:00
4  
Maybe your printk() isn't appearing where you expect it to appear. When you open another virtual console (or terminal) and type sudo tail -f /var/log/dmesg, do you see your Testing messages? –  Mike Nov 19 '11 at 0:00
    
Mike is probalby correct. Your shell is run under a different process than the console that the kernel is connected to. Ubuntu almost certainly redirects the output to the system log. –  Falmarri Nov 19 '11 at 0:03
show 1 more comment

2 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

But I don´t understand why the "Testing" didn't appeared on the shell.

I think, this is effect of printk's messages suppression. (more exactly:rate limiting)

Check the messages log or console for

printk: ### messages suppressed.

string.

This feature will stop printing a message, if there were a lot of messages in recent time.

Actual code is as 3.1 kernel: http://lxr.linux.no/#linux+v3.1.1/kernel/printk.c#L1621

1621 * printk rate limiting, lifted from the networking subsystem.
1622 *
1623 * This enforces a rate limit: not more than 10 kernel messages
1624 * every 5s to make a denial-of-service attack impossible.
1625 */
1626 DEFINE_RATELIMIT_STATE(printk_ratelimit_state, 5 * HZ, 10);
1627
1628 int __printk_ratelimit(const char *func)

So, As the open syscall is very-very popular (just do an strace -e open /bin/ls - I'll get 15 open syscalls for just starting an simplest ls), the rate limiting will be in effect. It will limit your message to be printed only one time in 5 seconds; not more than 10 messages in single "burst".

I can only suggest to create a special user with known UID and add an UID checking before printk in your additional printk-in-open code.

share|improve this answer
    
In fact , I want that the shell prints the word "Testing",because I want to do some tests with system call. Thank you for your answer. –  UserJ Nov 19 '11 at 0:13
    
Sorry , I think understood the comment now. –  UserJ Nov 19 '11 at 0:14
    
message from printk will not be printed by shell. It is printed by kernel on some text console (which is opened by Alt-F1) and also saved in dmesg buffer and also sent to syslog daemon. You just doing more printk, than is allowed to be printed. You should add some condition before printk, because open is one of most used syscall. You should only printk for case you are interested in, e.g. by testing UID or path. –  osgx Nov 19 '11 at 0:18
    
Well,Could you suggest me what I can put before printk(KERN_EMERG "Testing\n") to show the "Testing"? I didnt understand so well what I can put in the code.Thanks –  UserJ Nov 19 '11 at 0:25
    
[ 24.295775] audit_printk_skb: 30 callbacks suppressed Is this the problem? –  UserJ Nov 19 '11 at 0:33
show 2 more comments

printk calls appear in the kernel message buffer, not in your process' stdout/stderr

share|improve this answer
    
Could you tell me how I open the kernel message buffer and see the word "Testing"? Because I am not "finding" it.Thank you. –  UserJ Nov 19 '11 at 0:37
1  
@UserJ use the 'dmesg' command, or look in one of the syslog logs (under /var/log/ ) –  nos Nov 19 '11 at 2:43
    
Thank you .I`ll try here. –  UserJ Nov 19 '11 at 3:55
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.