Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm programming a very large purpose-driven Windows command prompt batch program.

The problem is that I can't suppress the error's text. I could "cls" but that means that almost every command will cls the prompt and I don't want to force that on users. I also tried using >nul after it, and 2>nul in front of the command. The problem with 2>nul CMDOW.EXE /RUN is that then it doesn't store the error in the ERRORLEVEL environment variable.... I also can't have this error info showing up almost every time they use a command in the prompt.

My console does tons of things, including quick navigation and web-page/program/folder access. Recently I have been trying to implement a basic wrapper around the central batch program so that if you type something that is an unrecognized command, it will first check to see if the text string you input is the beginning of a folder's name within your current directory. If so, it will auto-move you into the folder. If not, it will display the usual error message.

I made it so that the input is no longer standard dos input, but a set /p command with a prompt that imitates the usual interface. I got it so it doesn't wait when typing a program name when not preceded by "start" if its in a PATH using CMDOW.

Everything functions now except I have a small issue that's a large visual nuisance. I prompt the user and store the input to an environment variable, then use CMDOW.exe /RUN to first attempt to execute the input text and see if it's an executable file (this covers paths, as well as .exes in the current directory). I then check ERRORLEVEL to see if this resulted in an error. If so, I move on to the next method.

I've also tried writing a little C++ program to execute for me, it works easily with winexec but idk how to obtain error code to confirm the process started sucessfully. If I can do that, then I can just send that result to an environment variable. CreateProcess() doesn't work without being absolute with the location. I can't just plug in the input text and have it work but it pauses until termination anyway I believe. ShellExecute() works but doesn't seem as simple as plugging it in from input... though it appears to have a ready method of obtaining the output. I might add I'm not great at C++, I learn what I need to to get by.

I'm not sure how to get around this issue. I'm also not sure if there exists some special method to bypass that error output while still gaining the knowledge that it didn't execute properly.

Here is my code:

@SETLOCAL ENABLEDELAYEDEXPANSION
@ECHO OFF

@for /L %%i in (0,0,0) do @(
    set zinput=
    set /p zinput=^%time%[%cd:~0,1%]^>
    call :EXECUTE
    set zinput=
)

:EXECUTE
IF ("%zinput%")==("") GOTO :EOF
cmdow /run "%zinput%"
set ERRCODE=%ERRORLEVEL%
IF ("%ERRCODE%")==("1") call :UNDEFINED
GOTO :EOF

:UNDEFINED
%zinput%
set ERRCODE=%ERRORLEVEL%
IF %ERRCODE%==9009 GOTO ZDIR
GOTO :EOF

:ZDIR
set zDIR=
DIR /B /AD-H|sed -n "/^%zinput%/"Ip>"%aicnspath%\etc\dump.txt"
set /p zDIR=<"%aicnspath%\etc\dump.txt"
IF NOT DEFINED zDIR GOTO UNDEFINED2
cd %zDIR%
call "%aicnspath%\etc\update.bat"
cls
echo AUTO-MOVED INTO: %CD%|tr '[a-z]' '[A-Z]'|sed "s/^/%_hc%%_bc2%/"|sed "s/$/%_bc%/"
echo -----------------------------------------
echo/
GOTO :EOF

:UNDEFINED2
cls
echo/
echo  The string %_hc%%_bc2%^'%zinput%^'%_bc% is not recognized by AICNS as any internal or external command, operable program or batch file.
echo/
GOTO :EOF
share|improve this question
3  
Can you narrow it down? –  Mauricio Scheffer Nov 19 '11 at 3:04
    
I'm not sure "MS-DOS" is the correct label here. I was going to make a remark about people to whom everything that consists of pure text is "MS-DOS", but you seem to know what you're doing... –  Kerrek SB Nov 19 '11 at 3:05
1  
Please don't use ALL CAPS WHEN TYPING YOUR SUBJECT. It makes it hard to read, and it's extremely irritating. (Plus, it always makes someone have to edit the post immediately, which is also annoying.) Thanks. :) Also, can you trim it to something less verbose so it's at least readable? –  Ken White Nov 19 '11 at 3:16
    
FYI: 2>nul is redirecting stderr (stdin is 0, stdout is 1, stderr is 2). What if you redirected to a temp file? –  Steve Wellens Nov 19 '11 at 4:36
1  
@Zack: I strongly disagree; the Windows command shell language is derived from the DOS command shell language, but it's not the same thing. For one thing, it has considerably more functionality. –  Harry Johnston Nov 22 '11 at 1:58
show 1 more comment

2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Try this...

CMDOW /run "%zinput%" >nul 2>&1

You should still have access to the ERRORLEVEL after this.

share|improve this answer
add comment

I don't see any reason because 2>nul CMDOW.EXE /RUN don't return the ErrorLevel value whereas CMDOW.EXE /RUN return it, unless CMDOW.EXE was written this way; this sound very strange to me.

The Batch file below check if a command is an executable file and return these values via ErrorLevel: 0 if not found, 1 if found in current directory, and 2 if found in a directory of PATH variable. I hope you can use a modified version of this Batch file instead of CMDOW.EXE program to solve your problem.

PATHOF.BAT:

@ECHO OFF
SETLOCAL ENABLEDELAYEDEXPANSION
REM CREATE A LIST OF FILE NAMES ADDING THE EXECUTABLE EXTENSIONS
SET NAMEEXT=!PATHEXT:.=%1.!
REM SEARCHES FILE NAMES IN CURRENT DIRECTORY, IF FOUND: ERRORLEVEL=1
FOR %%N IN (%NAMEEXT%) DO IF EXIST %%N ECHO %%N & EXIT /B 1
REM SEARCHES FILE NAMES IN DIRECTORIES OF PATH VARIABLE, IF FOUND: ERRORLEVEL=2
FOR %%N IN (%NAMEEXT%) DO IF NOT "%%~$PATH:N" == "" ECHO %%~$PATH:N & EXIT /B 2
REM IF FILE NOT FOUND, ERRORLEVEL=0
ECHO '%1' is not an external command or batch file located in PATH & EXIT /B 0

Please, let me know if this method worked or if you got an additional problem using it.

share|improve this answer
    
I got it to work using startX which utilizes Createprocess(), but this will help me for my 2nd step which is checking for bats of the the same name in the current dir/paths. So thank you and I will try this out for sure. –  Acryte Nov 21 '11 at 6:57
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.