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Hi there,

While making a CRTP-based generic wrapper to call arbitrary library functions, I've encountered a problem which I have trouble understanding. Here is a very simplified code to illustrate the problem:

#include <iostream>

template< typename PValue, typename PDerived >
class TBase
{
 private:
  typedef TBase TSelf_;
  typedef PDerived TDerived_;

 protected:
  typedef PValue TValue_;

 protected:
  TBase( void )
  {
   std::cout << " TBase::TBase() " << std::endl;
  }

 public:
  void Foo( void )
  {
   std::cout << " TBase::Foo() " << std::endl;
  }

  template< typename PType >
  static void Call( PType /*pSomething*/, void(TDerived_::*pFunction)( void ) = &TSelf_::Foo, TDerived_ pDerived = TDerived_() )
  {
   ( pDerived.*pFunction )();
   std::cout << " static TBase::Call(). " << std::endl;
  }
};

template< typename PValue >
class TDerived : public TBase< PValue, TDerived< PValue > >
{
  friend class TBase< PValue, TDerived< PValue > > ;
 private:
  typedef TBase< PValue, TDerived > TBase_;
  typedef TDerived TSelf_;
 public:
  TDerived( void ) :
   TBase_()
  {
   std::cout << " TDerived::TDerived() " << std::endl;
  }
  void Foo( void )
  {
   std::cout << " TDerived::Foo() " << std::endl;
  }
  void Bar( void )
  {
   std::cout << " TDerived::Bar() " << std::endl;
  }
};

int main( void )
{
 TDerived< int >::Call( 1 );
 TDerived< int >::Call( 1, &TDerived< int >::Foo );
 TDerived< int >::Call( 1, &TDerived< int >::Bar, TDerived< int > () );
 return ( 0 );
}

Everything compiles and works as intended. However, if I try to use pointer to TDerived::Foo() as a default argument for the second parameter in TBase::Call(...):

static void Call( PType /*pSomething*/, void(TDerived_::*pFunction)( void ) = &TDerived_::Foo, TDerived_ pDerived = TDerived_() )

compilers gives a syntax error... I have a feeling it is related to how compiler parses code and that it cannot figure out pointer to a function of yet to be defined (or instantiated) class. However, it has no problem calling TDerived constructor as a default argument for the third parameter of TBase::Call(...). Can someone give me a definite answer about what's going on? Why derived class MFP is not accepted, and object of derived class is accepted as default arguments?

Thanks.

EDIT: compiler's error (MSVS2010 command line compiler):

FMain.cpp(224) : error C2061: syntax error : identifier 'TDerived_'; FMain.cpp(233) : see reference to class template instantiation 'TBase<PValue,PDerived> with [PValue=int,PDerived=TDerived<int>]' being compiled; FMain.cpp(323) : see reference to class template instantiation 'TDerived<PValue> with [PValue=int]' being compiled

It's a syntax error - it does not recognize TDerived_ as type in default argument for MFP. There are other errors following this one, they are all syntax errors, since function definition is ill-formed now. That is how I understand it.

EDIT: Basically, I don't understand why can I use an object of TDerived_ as a default argument, but can not use a pointer to a member function as a default argument.

EDIT: Ok, this is driving me crazy now. First of all, I changed to typedef TBase< PValue, TDerived > TBase_; as it was pointed out (thank you, guys!). Indeed, it only compiled under MSVC++, since this compiler does not do two-part parsing; i.e., on codepad.org (which uses g++ 4.1.2) it didn't compile. Second, after that, I tried to use static void Call( PType /*pSomething*/, void(TDerived_::*pFunction)( void ) = &TDerived_::Foo, TDerived_ pDerived = TDerived_() ) on codepad.org and... it compiled and run correctly! So I'm REALLY confused now: people explained to me why it's not correct (and I couldn't understand "why" (see my previous EDIT)) and now it turns out g++ compiles it correctly... Does it mean it just MSVC++ problem and not the code? Or code does have a problem from the Standard point of view (and I cannot see it) and g++ accept it "by mistake" (unlikely, I think)?.. Help?!

share|improve this question
    
What error compiler gives? Why don't you post that as well? Is it that you want us to compile this code, and see the error ourselves? – Nawaz Nov 19 '11 at 4:43
    
A "syntax error" error message is the least useful diagnostic message possible (except "there is an error somewhere"). – curiousguy Nov 19 '11 at 7:50
    
Re: your most recent comments - the code looks OK to me after the typedef change, but maybe someone with more extensive knowledge of the standard can comment. FWIW, after the change it compiles and runs for me on VS2008 and GCC 4.2.1. – msandiford Nov 20 '11 at 0:29
up vote 2 down vote accepted

The scoping for the TValue_ parameter to the type in the typedef for TBase_ in TDerived appears to be wrong (!)

You have:

 private:
  typedef TBase< TValue_, TDerived > TBase_;

I think you need:

 private:
  typedef TBase< typename TBase< PValue, TDerived< PValue > >::TValue_, TDerived > TBase_;

Or even just:

 private:
  typedef TBase< PValue, TDerived > TBase_;

EDIT: The C++ standard section 14.6.2 para 3 covers this case:

In the definition of a class or class template, if a base class depends on a template-parameter, the base class scope is not examined during unqualified name lookup either at the point of definition of the class template or member or during an instantiation of the class template or member

share|improve this answer
    
TValue_ is defined in TBase as protected typedef. TDerived inherits publicly from TBase and has access to its protected definitions. – Petr Budnik Nov 19 '11 at 6:48
    
@AzzA Actually msandiford did not say that TValue_ was not accessible in this context, he said it was not properly "scoped". He means that TValue_ is not visible here. – curiousguy Nov 19 '11 at 7:38
    
For an explanation of why TValue_ cannot be visible in the derived class in C++, see Using this keyword in destructor (closed) – curiousguy Nov 19 '11 at 7:49
    
@msandiford and curiousguy: thanks for the info, guys! So, obviously, the code is faulty (probably, in many ways) from the Standard point of view, it's just that MS compiler accepts it due to not having two-phase name look-up. Well, that sucks... – Petr Budnik Nov 19 '11 at 8:42
    
@AzzA The way MS handles templates is totally different from what the standard mandates (2 phase name lookup). The rules for templates were not clear in the early days of C++ templates (but if you read D&E, you can see that BS wanted something like 2 phase name lookup from the beginning), and parsing rules have been changed, notably requiring programmers to add typename all over the place. But these modern template rules already existed in 1998, so if MS clearly made a choice to not be standard conforming here. – curiousguy Nov 19 '11 at 16:08

Simple: when instantiating TBase< int, TDerived< int> > template class definition, the declaration of Call<> function template is instantiated:

  template< typename PType >
  static void Call( PType , void(TDerived_::*pFunction)() = &TSelf_::Foo, TDerived_ pDerived = TDerived_() )

(with TDerived_ = TDerived< int>), which is fine as TSelf_::Foo() is declared at this point.

OTOH, the problem with

static void Call( PType , void(TDerived_::*pFunction)() = &TDerived_::Foo, TDerived_ pDerived = TDerived_() )

is that TDerived_::Foo() is not declared during TBase< int, TDerived< int> > template class definition instantiation.

BTW, you don't need to specifiy a parameter list as ( void ); () has the same effect and is less verbose.

share|improve this answer
    
yes, but what about third default argument? Why can I use 'TDerived_' temporary as third default argument? If I cannot use address of TDerived_ member function, how can I create a TDerived_ object in the same scope? I must be really stupid, but I still don't get it... – Petr Budnik Nov 19 '11 at 8:47
    
I suppose, I need to get a compiler that follows the Standard. It's probably pointless asking "why this compiles and that does not" when compiler fundamentally allows code that is not suppose to compile according to the Standard. Thanks for input, guys. – Petr Budnik Nov 19 '11 at 9:38
    
@AzzA "Why can I use TDerived_ temporary as third default argument?" knowing that TDerived_ is a type, the meaning of TDerived_() is known: construct a temporary object of type TDerived_. Of course, the fact that there is an exactly one constructor that can take 0 argument, and that it is accessible in this context, must be checked later, but that would not impact the fact that the expression is a rvalue of type TDerived_. OTOH to compile TDerived_::Foo, the compiler needs to be able able to lookup the name in order to determine the type of the expression. – curiousguy Nov 19 '11 at 21:10
    
(...) But that's just my gut feeling. Don't take it as definitive statement, or as a careful analysis. – curiousguy Nov 19 '11 at 21:10

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