Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I'm trying to build an html file to monitor some things on a remote site- specifically, github.com. I'd like to be able to keep it to just that flat file, making the requests straight from the JS to github's API. My thought process went like this:

  1. Let's use jsonp, since I only need read access, so sticking with GETs should be fine.
  2. Ok, I'll use Github's OAuth instead of basic authentication!
    • That fails because the browser doesn't like me redirecting to a local resource: Not allowed to load local resource: file:///Users/... for understandable security reasons.
  3. Ok, I'll load Github's oauth in an iFrame, then get the resulting url (which should contain the oauth code I need).
    • That fails because you apparently can't access anything about a child iframe if it's on another domain, so unless I redirect back to file:///whatever, I can't get the final url. And, of course, I can't redirect to file:///whatever because of the `Not allowed to load local resource again.
  4. Ok, I'll use Cross-Origin Resource Sharing (going back to basic auth again)!

So, any suggestions as to how to successfully authenticate to this api from a single, local html file- either as a way around the above tacts, or another idea entirely?

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

If you are using google chrome you could try running it with the

--allow-file-access-from-files

switch enabled.

share|improve this answer
    
I don't think that'll help - AFAIK all it does is allow AJAX loading of file:/// if the origin was also within file:///. –  Alnitak Nov 19 '11 at 5:54
    
@Alnitak, is running a web server on your computer an option? That's the only other thing I've got left :( –  Esailija Nov 19 '11 at 6:20
1  
Yeah, running a web server is the last option, after checking stack overflow. :) Related to this answer, I think there's also a chrome option for just allowing cross-origin stuff, although I'd prefer not to have that on when I'm using it for normal stuff. –  Fishtoaster Nov 20 '11 at 2:37

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.