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I am new-bie to shell script. I am struggling with one scenario. The Scenario as follows, I have a function which will perform some tasks here I have to use if condition. If condition is true then it should call the respective function to perform the task.

For Example:-

if [ "$choice" = "true" ]
then 
  process_install
elif [ "$choice" = "false" ]
then 
  process_exit
fi

process_install()
{
  commands...
  commands...
}

process_exit()
{
  commands...
  commands...
}

Please let me know how to accomplish this.

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1  
Please pay attention to the preview of your question (it appears below the textbox you're typing it into), and fix it so it is properly aligned. Tab characters don't work, and lines should be indented four or more spaces as needed to align them properly. You can also just copy and paste the code, select it all, and either press Ctrl+K or click the {} button on the toolbar. You should still check the preview to make sure it's right before posting, though. Thanks. :) –  Ken White Nov 19 '11 at 7:34

6 Answers 6

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You don't specify which shell (there are many), so I am assuming Bourne Shell, that is I think your script starts with:

#!/bin/sh

Please remember to tag future questions with the shell type, as this will help the community answer your question.

You need to define your functions before you call them. Using ():

process_install()
{
    echo "Performing process_install() commands, using arguments [${*}]..."
}

process_exit()
{
    echo "Performing process_exit() commands, using arguments [${*}]..."
}

Then you can call your functions, just as if you were calling any command:

if [ "$choice" = "true" ]
then
    process_install foo bar
elif [ "$choice" = "false" ]
then
    process_exit baz qux

You may also wish to check for invalid choices at this juncture...

else
    echo "Invalid choice [${choice}]..."
fi

See it run with three different values of ${choice}.

Good luck!

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Hi @Johnsyweb, I haven't found any difference between my example and yours...Could u please explain brief....Thanks... –  user626206 Nov 19 '11 at 9:34
    
My example defines the functions before (that is earlier in the script) they are called. –  Johnsyweb Nov 19 '11 at 9:42
    
I have tried that too but it doesn't works... Thanks. –  user626206 Nov 19 '11 at 9:49
1  
What error do you see? –  Johnsyweb Nov 19 '11 at 10:03
    
I have made some mistake in my script. Its works fine..Thanks for your help... –  user626206 Nov 19 '11 at 12:27
#!/bin/bash

process_install()
{
    commands... 
    commands... 
}

process_exit()
{
    commands... 
    commands... 
}


if [ "$choice" = "true" ] then
    process_install
else
    process_exit
fi
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1  
+1 and Welcome to Stack Overflow. Your answer illustrates what to do - but would benefit from a little explanation too. The questioner might not spot the salient differences between what you wrote and what they've got. –  Jonathan Leffler Nov 19 '11 at 7:44
3  
You're missing a semicolon before then. –  camh Nov 19 '11 at 10:37

Summary:

  • Define functions before using them.
  • Once defined, treat them as commands.

Consider this script, called funcdemo:

#!/bin/bash

[ $# = 0 ] && exhort "write nastygram"

exhort(){
    echo "Please, please do not forget to $*"
}

[ $# != 0 ] && exhort "write begging letter"

In use:

$ funcdemo
./funcdemo: line 3: exhort: command not found
$ funcdemo 1
Please, please do not forget to write begging letter
$

Note the potential for a missing function to lie undiscovered for a long time (think 'by a customer at the most critical wrong moment'). It only matters whether the function exists when it is executed, the same as it only matters whether any other command exists when you try to execute it. Indeed, until it goes to execute the command, the shell neither knows nor cares whether it is an external command or a function.

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You can create another script file separately for the functions and invoke the script file whenever you want to call the function. This will help you to keep your code clean.

Function Definition : Create a new script file
Function Call       : Invoke the script file
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Example of using a function() in bash:

#!/bin/bash
# file.sh: a sample shell script to demonstrate the concept of Bash shell functions
# define usage function
usage(){
    echo "Usage: $0 filename"
    exit 1
}

# define is_file_exists function
# $f -> store argument passed to the script
is_file_exists(){
    local f="$1"
    [[ -f "$f" ]] && return 0 || return 1
}
# invoke  usage
# call usage() function if filename not supplied
[[ $# -eq 0 ]] && usage

# Invoke is_file_exits
if ( is_file_exists "$1" )
then
 echo "File found: $1"
else
 echo "File not found: $1"
fi
share|improve this answer
    
Hi @Authman Apatira, Thanks for your reply.Please provide the example for my scenario... –  user626206 Nov 19 '11 at 7:32
1  
It would be more succinct to write 'return [[ -f "$f" ]]' in your file existence function, would it not? –  Jonathan Leffler Nov 19 '11 at 7:35
    
Hi @Jonathan Leffler, Its not working. Could u please provide example as per my Scenario...Thanks. –  user626206 Nov 19 '11 at 8:33

The functions need to be defined before being used. There is no mechanism is sh to pre-declare functions, but a common technique is to do something like:

main() {
  case "$choice" in
    true)  process_install;;
    false) process_exit;;
  esac
}

process_install()
{
  commands...
  commands...
}

process_exit()
{
  commands...
  commands...
}

main()
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