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This is the code that I have to refactor for my homework:

if (state == TEXAS) {
    rate = TX_RATE;
    amt = base * TX_RATE;
    calc = 2 * basis(amt) + extra(amt) * 1.05;
} else if ((state == OHIO) || (state == MAINE)) {
    rate = (state == OHIO) ? OH_RATE : MN_RATE;
    amt = base * rate;
    calc = 2 * basis(amt) + extra(amt) * 1.05;
    if (state == OHIO)
        points = 2;
} else {
    rate = 1;
    amt = base;
    calc = 2 * basis(amt) + extra(amt) * 1.05;
}

I have done something like this

if (state == TEXAS) {
    rate = TX_RATE;
    calculation(rate);
} 
else if ((state == OHIO) || (state == MAINE))
    {
rate = (state == OHIO) ? OH_RATE : MN_RATE;

calculation(rate);

if (state == OHIO)
    points = 2;
}

else {
    rate = 1;
    calculation(rate);
}

function calculation(rate)
{
    amt = base * rate;
    calc = 2 * basis(amt) + extra(amt) * 1.05;
}

How could I have done better?
Edit i have done code edit amt = base * rate;

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1  
When I ran your code through Lindent to make it legible, it complained of an unmatched else in the second block -- because if (state == OHIO) appears to be missing a {. I didn't really want to add it myself, because the { might need to go elsewhere. (Unlikely, but still.) Please add the { as needed. –  sarnold Nov 19 '11 at 9:19
3  
I'm not sure whether to upvote or downvote for using state to refer to US states, not state machine states, and TX_RATE being Texas tax rate, not transmission rate. (Just the teacher being cute?) –  Potatoswatter Nov 19 '11 at 11:01
2  
That's a very nice homework assignment from you profesor! My compliments :) –  vidstige Nov 19 '11 at 18:53
    
You've tagged this as both Java and C++. Which language are you looking to refactor with? –  Erica Feb 12 '12 at 22:40
1  
So here's my question: Did the professor credit Andrew Hunt and David Thomas with the question? If not, it's direct plagiarism from The Pragmatic Programmer Exercise 38. Their answer is pretty much the one selected here although you can do them one better and also remove the magic numbers when you refactor. –  Tod Feb 16 '12 at 21:39

8 Answers 8

up vote 6 down vote accepted
+50

Steve's point about the switch statement is a good one, but I'd like to suggest a different approach: arrays.

If you store the rate information in an array and index into it by state, you can make maintaining this sort of code easier in the long term.

Consider this:

#define OTHER 0
#define OHIO 1
#define MAINE 2
#define TEXAS 3

int rates[4];
rates[OTHER] = ...
rates[OHIO] = ...
rates[MAINE] = ...
rates[TEXAS] = ...

See what this might let a calculate function do differently. (Note that in "real life", the int rates[4] array could be done many different ways -- a hashmap, a simple array of struct rate { char state[12]; int rate; } objects with state names and rates stored together at runtime, or a simple statically-assigned array int rates[4] = {0, 2, 3, 10};. I chose this because it shows indexing the array by #defined content. enum also works.)

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yes thats good choice thanks. –  Human love Nov 19 '11 at 9:30
6  
Do NOT use #define in C++ except if you really have a good reason to do so. #defines are considered evil for good reasons. See the C++ FAQ at parashift.com/c++-faq-lite/inline-functions.html, Questions 9.5 and 39.4-39.6. The weapon of choice in C++ are enums, not #defines. Still an upvote for showing this generally very usefull technique. –  LiKao Feb 12 '12 at 22:07
    
@LikAo: Definitely a good point, but the link is all about inline functions. Did you mean to paste another URL that discussed enums instead? Thanks! –  sarnold Feb 13 '12 at 0:33
    
@sarnold: I just added that link as a starting point, because it his hard to give one link referring to 9.5, 39.4, 39.5, and 39.6. That page has 9.5 on it which in turn links to the others. I probably should have chosen the main page of the FAQ instead. Also you might point out, that the FAQ only mentiones #define macros but not constants, but similar problems apply to them. I just had to fix a lot of #defines, because they appeared in expressions where they did not produce correctly typed statements. C++ has better mechanisms, so one should use these. –  LiKao Feb 13 '12 at 9:32
class State {
private :
  double taxRate;
  int baseWeight;
  int extraWeight;
  string name;
  base;
public:
  State(string name, double taxRate = 1, int point =0, double baseWeight=2, double extraWeight=1.05); //implement the method yourself
  double extra(double base);
  double basis(double base);
  double calculate(double base){
      return baseWeight * basis(base) + baseWeight * extra(base);
  }
  int point(){return point};

};

Now how to use it:

State ohio ("OHIO", OH_RATE, 2);
cout << "OHIO result:" ohio.calculate() << " point:" << ohio.point() << endl;
share|improve this answer
    
You forgot about 'points' variable –  Piotr Kukielka Nov 19 '11 at 9:39
    
added, thx, @kuki –  ComfortablyNumb Nov 19 '11 at 9:46

Anyone thought about doing a real OO solution for this one? If I ever ran across such code in a project that claimed to be OO I'd seriously say it wasn't.

If you see variables such as "state" that represent different types of an object you have a good candiate for inheritance. Without giving it too much though (since it is your homework, after all), you might want to do something along these lines (in pseudo code - hope you get the idea).

 abstract class State:
   protected abstract int getAmt()

   protected int basis(amt):
      return ...?

   protected int extra(amt):
      return ...?

   public int getPoints()
      return 1 // Just a guess ?

   public final int calculateTax():
      return 2 * basis(getAmt()) + extra(getAmt()) * 1.05


 final class DefaultState > State:
   protected int getAmt():
      return base


 final class Texas > State:
   protected int getAmt():
      return base * TX_RATE


 final class Ohio > State:
   public getPoints():
      return 2

   protected int getAmt():
      return base * OH_RATE


 final class Ohio > State:
   protected int getAmt():
      return base * MN_RATE

The concept used here is called "Open Recursion", in case you were wondering

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+1 for abstract classes –  Kris Feb 14 '12 at 21:39

You have a 'Java' tag, so assuming this is in fact Java friendly, I'd do it with an Enum:

enum USStates
{
    TEXAS(TX_RATE), OHIO(OH_RATE), MAINE(MN_RATE), OTHER(1);

    final double rate;

    USStates(double rate)
    {
        this.rate = rate;
    }

    public double calc(double base)
    {
        double amt = amt(base);
        return 2.0 * basis(amt) + extra(amt) * 1.05;
    }

    public double amt(double base)
    {
        return base * rate;
    }
}

Then, in your actual executable code:

    rate = state.rate;
    amt = state.amt(base);
    calc = state.calc(base);

    if (USStates.OHIO == state)
    {
        points = 2;
    }

If "base" is a constant (that wasn't clear from the example code) this can be simplified further by accessing it directly as a final rather than passing it in as a parameter.

This solution has a few benefits. Firstly, the actual rates for a state do not actually need to be in their own separate constant using a naming convention, but can actually be stored as part of the Enum itself (so instead of "TEXAS(TX_RATE)" you could actually just enter "TEXAS(1.4)" (or whatever its value is)) and the rate is then maintained as part of the "TEXAS" enumerated type.

It also has the benefit that the calculation logic is captured (encapsulated, even) along with the constants it operates on.

By using Enums, you ensure that people can't accidentally use invalid operations on your constants (like accidentally performing mathematical operations on them).

By reducing the number of conditional statements, you significantly reduce the number of possible execution paths. Fewer possible paths means fewer possibilities for null pointers and uninitialized variables. (As the sample code stands, there's a risk of an uninitialized variable error in "points" for any states other than OHIO)

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I would suggest putting points in the enum so any points can be applied to any state in the future. –  Paul Feb 16 '12 at 21:41
    
@Paul, the problem with having points in the enum is that it's undefined for all enums except Ohio. If it is in the enum, then all other states would need a value (possibly null). In the original snippet, points is only modified for Ohio, so if it had a value before the snippet, it would still have that value after the snippet. If I add "int points()" to the enum, then for other states the original value would be overwritten by the default. (Thus my 'uninitialized variables' comment above). As I'm not sure what's happening before/after the code, I'm playing it safe. –  Erica Feb 16 '12 at 22:19
    
fair enough :) you make a good case –  Paul Feb 17 '12 at 7:40

Don't want to do the homework for you, so here's a nudge: Have a look at the switch statement.

Moving the repeated logic into a function is a good idea but you could also change your logic to only call this code once rather than in each if block, you are setting the rate variable each time anyway so maybe you need to only calculate amt and calc once.

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1) Use switch as Steve said:

switch(state) {
  case TEXAS: calcTexas(); break;
  case OHIO: calcOhio(); break;
  case MAINE: calcMaine() break;
  default: calcDefault(); break;
}


2) Use 'extract method' refactoring (you did this, but you have mistake in your example):

int calculation(int rate) {
  amt  = base * rate;
  return (2 * basis(amt)) + (extra(amt) * 1.05);
}


3) If extra(amt) returns int type remember to cast it to float because int * float = int (At least in C++, I'm not sure if it was the same in java)

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Similar to kuki's answer:

switch(state)
{
    case TEXAS: rate = TX_RATE; break;
    case OHIO: rate = OH_RATE; break;
    case MAINE: rate = MN_RATE; break;
    default: rate = 1; break;
}

amt = base * rate;

calc = 2 * basis(amt) + extra(amt) * 1.05

//if the OHIO points = 2 thing is really necessary
if(OHIO == state) points = 2;

Might not be OOP, but it sure is smaller (and, imo, more maintainable) ;)

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Instead of using If/else or switch statements use Strategy pattern. Then you can add new state in your example without changing code.

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