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I'm trying something similar to this, and only one of the @Before methods gets called:

public abstract class ControllerBase extends Controller {
  @Before
  static void foo() {
    // this actually gets called
  }
}

public class ConcreteController extends ControllerBase {
  @Before
  static void bar() {
    // This DOES NOT get called
  }

  public static void index() {
    render();
  }
}

Is this a bug, feature, or something I'm doing wrong?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You're trying to do something weird. And I think your example doesn't match your question. Did you mean to implement ConcreteController on ControllerBase? Rather than both of them extending on Controller?

The @before tag is a concrete class tag. Only the one in the concrete class will get executed.

You can @override the original function, but I don't think that's what you were looking for.

The best way to get what you want is to remove @before from the abstract and from the concrete function call the implemented function you want to run.

public abstract class ControllerBase extends Controller {
  static void foo() {
    // this actually gets called
  }
}

public static class ConcreteController extends Controller {
  @Before
  static void bar() {
    foo();
    // This DOES NOT get called
  }

  public static void index() {
    render();
  }
}
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Thanks. I fixed my example - I really think all @Before methods in the inheritance chain should be called (like the semantics of jUnit's @Before). Opened an issue play.lighthouseapp.com/projects/57987-play-framework/tickets/… –  ripper234 Nov 19 '11 at 13:17
    
Actually, I found the problem - multiple @Before attributes do work (including those on abstract classes). See my answer. –  ripper234 Nov 20 '11 at 10:59

Yes, Play! will call all the methods in the inheritance hiererchy annotated with @Before.

The problem I ran into was that the @Before I was using was actually org.junit.Before instead of play.mvc.Before !

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Yes exactly, you can use @Before where ever you like, static methods are inherited in Java. –  Marius Soutier Nov 20 '11 at 12:16

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