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I am looping through some elements and need to determine if an element has a child(grandchild?) with the li tag, like in the information element below. The li elements will vary in id so I am not referencing them that way. I am currently looping through the li elements and if I check for children it always returns true because there are "a" tag children, I just want to check for 'lil' tag children.

            <ul id="navMenu">
                <li id="home"><a href="#home" rel="ajax">Home</a></li>
                <li id="information"><a href="#information" rel="ajax">Information</a>
                    <ul>
                       <li><a href="#credits" rel="ajax">Credits</a></li>
                       <li><a href="#lorem_ipsum" rel="ajax">Lorem Ipsum</a></li>
                    </ul>
                </li>
                <li id="contact"><a href="#contact" rel="ajax">Contact</a></li>
            </ul>

Here is what I have now...

        $('#test').load('../common.html #navMenu', function() {
            $.each($("#test #navMenu li"), function(i,v) {
                var theElement = $(v);
                if ($(theElement).children('li')){
                    alert('This Element has children');
                }
            });
        });

Thank you once again, Todd

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4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

$(theElement).children('li') returns a jQuery object which always passes an if clause, even when it's empty.

Moreover, you want .find, since .children only returns direct children and not grandchildren.

So:

if ($(theElement).find('li').length > 0) {

or:

if ($(theElement).find('li').length) {
// 0 won't pass an if clause, and all other numbers will, so you can eliminate `> 0`
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Cool tip about 0 not passing an if clause, seems very obvious in hindsight. –  maddogandnoriko Nov 20 '11 at 13:42

You could try -

$('#test').load('../common.html #navMenu', function() {
    $.each($("#test #navMenu li"), function(i,v) {
        var theElement = $(v);
        if ($(theElement).find('li').length > 0){
            alert('This Element has children');
        }
    });
});

find will go deeper into the current element than children which only searches one level down.

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Thank you works perfect. And I discovered a new function, "find". –  maddogandnoriko Nov 20 '11 at 13:41

Given:

> var theElement = $(v); 
> if ($(theElement).children('li')) {  
>   alert('This Element has children'); 
> }

doesn't $(v) return an jQuery object? So $(theElement) is redundant.

Anyhow, if v is a reference to one of the elements passed to .each, then you can replace all of the above with:

if (v.getElementsByTagName('li').length) {
  /* v has li descendants */
]
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Thank you, you are correct, theElement is redundant and I have removed it. This also works very well. I am not sure which I will use but it is always good to see alternatives, if not just to learn from them. –  maddogandnoriko Nov 20 '11 at 13:50

you could also add the extra li to your query: "#test #navMenu li li"

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I need to iterate through the parent elements also, I think this would miss them. –  maddogandnoriko Nov 20 '11 at 13:46

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