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I have classes like the following. That is many classes with the same few properties such as CreatedBy and ModifiedBy:

public class Test1 {
    [DisplayName("Created By")]
    public string CreatedBy { get; set; }
    [DisplayName("Modified By")]
    public string ModifiedBy { get; set; }
}
public class Test2 {
    [DisplayName("Created By")]
    public string CreatedBy { get; set; }
    [DisplayName("Modified By")]
    public string ModifiedBy { get; set; }
}

I would like to have a block of code that I reuse in different views for these classes. The block of the code should have formatting for the data such as:

        <div class="a">
            @Html.LabelFor(model => model.Note.CreatedBy)
            @Html.TextBoxFor(model => model.Note.CreatedBy)
        </div>
        <div class="b">
            @Html.LabelFor(model => model.Note.ModifiedBy)
            @Html.TextBoxFor(model => model.Note.ModifiedBy)
        </div>

I looked at a few different ways of doing this and initially was using a class to hold all the modified and created data. My solution was based upon this:

Another solution

However now I have been told I cannot use a class as is used in this solution where the data is held in a class RowInfo. I must use fields directly as in the classes Test1 and Test2 I show above.

Can anyone suggest how I could arrange for the HTML code to be reused by more than one class. I understand I could use a few different ways but all that I know of seem to not allow me to share code between multiple classes that share the same fields.

I hope this makes sense. If not tell me and I will explain more.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You could define a base view model:

public abstract class BaseViewModel
{
    [DisplayName("Created By")]
    public virtual string CreatedBy { get; set; }
    [DisplayName("Modified By")]
    public virtual string ModifiedBy { get; set; }
}

and then have the two similar view models derive from this base view model (as they are sharing common functionality):

public class Test1 : BaseViewModel 
{
}

public class Test2 : BaseViewModel 
{
}

Next you could define a custom editor template for the base view model (~/Views/Shared/EditorTemplates/BaseViewModel.cshtml):

@model BaseViewModel
<div class="a">
    @Html.LabelFor(model => model.CreatedBy)
    @Html.TextBoxFor(model => model.CreatedBy)
</div>
<div class="b">
    @Html.LabelFor(model => model.ModifiedBy)
    @Html.TextBoxFor(model => model.ModifiedBy)
</div>

As a side note you could also use an interface instead of an abstract class for the base model:

public interface IBaseViewModel
{
    [DisplayName("Created By")]
    string CreatedBy { get; set; }
    [DisplayName("Modified By")]
    string ModifiedBy { get; set; }
}

and have the editor template typed typed to this interface.

Then for your main view model:

public class MyViewModel
{
    public Test1 Test1 { get; set; }
    public Test2 Test2 { get; set; }
}

you could invoke the custom editor template using the EditorFor helper:

@model MyViewModel
@Html.EditorFor(x => x.Test1)
@Html.EditorFor(x => x.Test2)
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I am a bit confused. My classes Test1 and Test2 are data classes and inherit as follows: "public class Test1 : TableServiceEntity" Do you mean to call it "BaseViewModel" ? Also can they derive from more than one class? –  Samantha J Nov 19 '11 at 14:43
    
@SamanthaJ, rule number 1 in ASP.NET MVC (and the most important rule for me): you never pass data/domain classes to your views. You always define and use view models. View models are classes specifically defined for the requirements of your view. So if you are saying that Test1 and Test2 derive from some TableServiceEntity, those classes should never reach your view. They could be manipulated by your controller action but this action should map them to a corresponding view model you have defined. It is this view model that is passed to the view then. –  Darin Dimitrov Nov 19 '11 at 14:44
    
Yes I am using viewModels. Class Test1 and Test2 both have there own viewModels and then views with a lot of fields. Just at the bottom of each view I would like to put this shared block. If I use an editor template then can I just use this for that particular block of fields? Hope it makes sense. –  Samantha J Nov 19 '11 at 14:47
    
@SamanthaJ, yes you can on the condition Test1 and Test2 derive from a common base view model as I explained in my answer. Another possibility is to have them implement a common interface which would serve as a base model and then make the editor template typed to this interface. Also you say that Test1 and Test2 are view models but in the same time they both derive from some TableServiceEntity domain models. This is a contradiction. View models do not derive from domain models nor have any domain models as properties. It is a false impression of view models. –  Darin Dimitrov Nov 19 '11 at 14:55
    
Test1 and Test2 are classes. Each has a viewModel and a view. Sorry for my poor explanation. How can I make a view model implement a common interface. That sounds like a good possibility? –  Samantha J Nov 19 '11 at 14:58

have you tried putting the code into partial view which you can then use in any page/view?

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1  
That would be fine. BUT if I understand this correctly my partial view needs a model to be specified and the views for these classes use different models. So I can't share one partial view. Please correct me if I am wrong. Thanks –  Samantha J Nov 19 '11 at 14:35

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