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I have a c# form app that serves as an UI and executes an external exe. I want to make a progress bar increment until the external exe finishes executing. so i have the following code:

// create thread and Start external process

Thread MyNewThread = new Thread(new ThreadStart(startmodule));
MyNewThread.Start();

            do
            {
                if (progressBar1.Value < 100)
                {
                    progressBar1.Value++;
                }
            } while (MyNewThread.IsAlive); 

            label5.Text = "Status: Done";

// startmodule()
void startmodule()
    {
        ProcessObj = new Process();
        ProcessObj.StartInfo.FileName = ApplicationPath;
        ProcessObj.StartInfo.Arguments = ApplicationArguments;
        ProcessObj.StartInfo.WindowStyle = ProcessWindowStyle.Hidden;
        ProcessObj.Start();
    }

Instead it fills the bar up instantly and shows "Done" message but the external exe (AppPath) still runs in the background.

Please post some ideas im stuck. i don't know whats wrong. Thank you for your time.

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6 Answers 6

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You cannot make this work, you cannot guess how long the process will take. Set the ProgressBar.Style property to Marquee. Set it Visible property to true when you start the process. Use the Process.Exited event to set it back to false. Like this:

public partial class Form1 : Form {
    public Form1() {
        InitializeComponent();
        progressBar1.Style = ProgressBarStyle.Marquee;
        progressBar1.Visible = false;
    }

    private void ButtonRunProcess_Click(object sender, EventArgs e) {
        var ProcessObj = new Process();
        ProcessObj.SynchronizingObject = this;
        ProcessObj.EnableRaisingEvents = true;
        ProcessObj.Exited += new EventHandler(ProcessObj_Exited);
        ProcessObj.StartInfo.FileName = @"c:\windows\notepad.exe";
        // etc...
        ProcessObj.Start();
        progressBar1.Visible = true;
    }

    void ProcessObj_Exited(object sender, EventArgs e) {
        progressBar1.Visible = false;
    }
}
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Well the loop is being run so fast, that it reaches 100% before your task is actually completed. The condition that the loop is being check for (The thread being alive) is going to be true until your task is completed, but the loop is causing the progress bar to fill up prematurely.

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1  
Tim's on the prowl here. There's nothing in your loop tied to actual progress, so the loop will just run as fast as possible, hence why it appears to jump to 100% instantly. You might look into using a BackgroundWorker, as it supports a ReportProgress method and can inform your main thread of progress asynchronously. And really, your background thread is probably best equipped to know how much it has done or not. –  Sean Hanley Nov 19 '11 at 15:07
    
Now I'm struggling to understand what you mean by "Perhaps you could increment your progress bar within your start module" –  David Heffernan Nov 19 '11 at 15:23
    
Struggle no longer. –  Tim Nov 19 '11 at 18:13

In order to run a progress bar you have to be able to quantify the progress of the long running task. You have nothing in the code that attempts to quantify this.

You would need there to be communication between the two processes in order to make this progress bar work well. In other words the external process needs to send messages back to the parent app informing the parent app of the measure of progress. Now, that can be hard to achieve so a marquee style progress bar may be more appropriate.

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Finally i got some "free" time to test the backgroundworker as suggested above. i can say it's the best solution and it doesn't freeze the UI. Example implementation follows:

preparemodule()
{
  ProcessObj = new Process();
  ProcessObj.StartInfo.FileName = ApplicationPath;
  ProcessObj.StartInfo.Arguments = ApplicationArguments;
}

void run_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
  preparemodule();
  backgroundWorker1.RunWorkerAsync(ProcessObj);
}

void backgroundWorker1_DoWork(object sender, DoWorkEventArgs e)
{
  int i=0;

  ProcessObj.Start();

  while (checkifexists("notepad", 0) == true)
  {
    i++;
    label5.Text = "Status: notepad running... " + progressBar1.Value.ToString() + "%";
    Thread.Sleep(3000);
    backgroundWorker1.ReportProgress(i);

    if ((backgroundWorker1.CancellationPending == true))
    {
      e.Cancel = true;
    }
  }
}

void backgroundWorker1_ProgressChanged(object sender, ProgressChangedEventArgs e)
    {
        if (e.ProgressPercentage <= 100)
        {
            progressBar1.Value = e.ProgressPercentage;
        }
    }

 void backgroundWorker1_RunWorkerCompleted(object sender, RunWorkerCompletedEventArgs e)
    {

        label5.Text = "Status: Done";
    }

 void cancel_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {     
        backgroundWorker1.CancelAsync();
    }

As you see we can even cancel it. and by checking if notepad is running we can increment out progressbar. Dont forget to enable bgWorker's "reportsprogress" and "supportscancellation" properties somewhere in your code. i hope it helps someone.

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First, @Tim answer is right about what is happening.

If you can control the external app, make a way to it communicate with the main process telling the current state and update the progress bar according to these messages.

If is not possible, try to estimate the execution time and set the progress according to the execution time. This is valid if it performs always in same time for the same task.

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Well the problem is that i can control it and the time varies, so no communication is possible. It seems the last resort is the marquee style. But ill give background worker a try. If you have any good examples please post them. Thank you all. –  sparky Nov 19 '11 at 15:52
    
correction: can't –  sparky Nov 19 '11 at 16:02

Background worker thread was designed for this sort of thing. It has an event you can fire while processing something, you handle it and update your progress bar. Course as noted by others you don't seem to have any measure of progress, just some time has passed, so it's not really an indication of progress you want but some sort of "I'm busy" animation, if you use a progress bar for that you get all sorts of issues that drive the UI boys mad, like it never gets to 100%, or it gets to 100% well before the operation has finished, or even cycles round.

So if you can indicate some progress from the thread, e.g if you are looping through X items fire the progress event every 10% of X. Use a Background worker thread. If you can't don't use a progress bar kick the thread off an make some animated control visible. When the thread finishes make the animation invisible again. What and how of the animation is up to you and your UI boys.

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