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            class userSessionManager
{
    public $_uname;
    private $_pword;
    private $_userDB_Accessor;

    function __construct($userAccessor)
    {
        $this->_userDB_Accessor = $userAccessor;            
    }
    function tryLogin()
    {
        //  get user information
        if ($_SERVER['REQUEST_METHOD'] == 'POST')
        {
            // get username and pasword from POST data and make it safe for database
            $this->_uname = quote_smart(htmlspecialchars($_POST['userName']));
            $this->_pword = quote_smart(htmlspecialchars($_POST['password']));
        }
        else // username and password were not set
        {
            return false;
        }

        $loginPassed = $this->_userDB_Accessor->login($this->_uname, $this->_pword);

        if($loginPassed == true)
        {
            $this->makeSession();
        }

        return $loginPassed;
    }
    private function makeSession()
    {
        session_start();
        $_SESSION['userName'] = $this->_uname;
    }
    function userHasSession()
    {
        session_start();
        if(! isset($_SESSION['userName']))  // session not properly created
        {
            return false;
        }

        $this->_uname = $_SESSION['userName'];  //save username to object

        //destroy and recreate session for security reasons
        session_destroy();
        $this->makeSession();
        return true;
    }
}

So, I read this article on how someone could gain access to an account with the session ID number. One solution listed was to reset the session ID number each time the page is loaded. Would this be a secure implementation of that idea?


Thank you all for the suggestions here is what I did to use them:

        private function makeSession()
    {
        session_start();
        session_regenerate_id();    // reset session id for securty
        $_SESSION['userName'] = $this->_uname;
        $_SESSION['userIP'] = $_SERVER['REMOTE_ADDR'];
        $_SESSION['userBrowser'] = $_SERVER['HTTP_USER_AGENT'];
    }
    function userHasSession()
    {
        session_start();

        if(!isset($_SESSION['userName']) || // check for a created user
            $_SESSION['userIP'] != $_SERVER['REMOTE_ADDR'] || // check for the same IP address
            $_SESSION['userBrowser'] != $_SERVER['HTTP_USER_AGENT'] //check for same Browser and OS
            ) 
        {
            session_regenerate_id();
            session_unset();
            session_destroy();
            return false;
        }
        return true;    // legit user
    }
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4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If the session identifier is regenerated every time there is a change in the level of privilege, the risk of session fixation is practically eliminated:

session_regenerate_id()

<?php
$_SESSION['logged_in'] = FALSE;
if (check_login())
{
session_regenerate_id();
$_SESSION['logged_in'] = TRUE;
}
?>

I do not recommend regenerating the session identifier on every page. While this seems like a secure approach—and it is—it provides no more protection than regenerating the session identifier whenever there is a change in the level of privilege. More importantly, it can adversely affect your legitimate users, especially if the session identifier is being propagated in the URL. A user might use the browser’s history mechanism to return to a previous page, and the links on that page will reference a session identifier that no longer exists. If you regenerate the session identifier only when there is a change in the level of privilege, the same situation is possible, but a user who returns to a page prior to the change in the level of privilege is less likely to be surprised by a loss of session, and this situation is also less common.

Have a look at http://phpsecurity.org/ch04.pdf for more information.

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Massive overkill... session_destroy does not remove the session cookie, it just basically does

$_SESSION = array()

and erases the server-side session data. To prevent stealing the session cookie, you have to use session_regenerate_id() to generate a new session ID.

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You should use [session_unset()][1] and [session_destroy()][2] both. Note that session_destroy() only empties out the variables when the page is reloaded or redirected to some other page. As long as it's the same page, the variables are still usable after invoking [session_destroy()][3], so it is best practice to use [session_unset()][5] just before [session_destroy()][4].

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I would add the IP address to the session and check it every request the user does.

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Bad idea. There's far too many users sharing IPs (think basically ALL mobile users, people behind nat proxies/gateways, etc...). –  Marc B Nov 19 '11 at 16:35
    
Yes, you do not need to regenerate a new session on every page load. Adding a check against an IP would help. You can also check against browser, operating system, etc. –  frustratedtech Nov 19 '11 at 16:38
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