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If I've written a piece of code which is maybe a bit simplistic but I understand how every little bit works and if something goes wrong I can easily identify and correct the problem, why should I use a tool like ReSharper to turn my code into something I don't understand?

Surely if you can't write the complicated code yourself, using a code refactoring tool is just going to cause issues because you won't be able to understand the new code when something goes wrong, and if you can write the refactored code manually why do you need the tool?

Or is there something I'm missing?

Thanks

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closed as not constructive by Don Roby, Luke Girvin, skaffman, Jim Lewis, Andrew Barber Nov 19 '11 at 22:39

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Umm...it's true -- if you don't understand the code that ReSharper generates (and you don't want to bother learning) then you shouldn't use tools to refactor your code. –  Kirk Woll Nov 19 '11 at 16:39
    
I never said I didn't want to learn, I do want to learn, that's why I don't want to use the tools. –  JMK Nov 19 '11 at 16:40
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Just what is it you think "refactoring" is doing? When you rename a class, you are refactoring. The whole point is the concept of evolving your code, changing the design when you realize it's fallen short. –  Kirk Woll Nov 19 '11 at 16:43
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The point of refactoring is to make code less complicated. The statement "if you can't write the complicated code yourself" has me baffled. –  William Pursell Nov 19 '11 at 22:14
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5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I have never used a refactoring tool, but I imagine you could learn from the way it re-factors the code for you. However, you NEED to be able to sense when your code needs refactoring and know how to carry out the re-factoring on your own, or you will never live up to your potential as a programmer. It seems relying on a refactoring tool deprives you of picking up a sense of when things need refactoring. Definitely learn to refactor you own code.

[1] You will arrive at a cleaner solution that is easier for you and others to read

[2] Reducing code repetition will likely reduce bugs, or make them easier to find and fix only once rather than multiple times throughout the code.

[3] Once you have re-factored enough code, it will influence your coding habits and style so you more often code clean the first time, implying less refactoring.

Best motivation to refactor your code: It is no fun working with some one else's sloppy code ( unless you get to gut it quickly in front of them. That's always fun. )

If this re-factoring tool is some requirement for your job or class, you must learn it. Remember to test small. You may want to create a version of a small program when you think it needs re-factoring, and then in another version, do the re-factoring manually. Then feed the old version to the re-factoring software and compare your results.

Good luck! :)

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Thankyou and thanks to everyone else for your answers. I recently had someone tell me I should refactor my code and give me a quick resharper tutorial, and I no longer understood the code, I will read up on refactoring! =) –  JMK Nov 19 '11 at 18:27
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Refactoring is used to improve the structure of code to improve efficiency, readability, maintainability, reduce redundancy, and the like. For very simple code there probably is no good reason to refactor. As code increases in complexity, refactoring becomes a valuable tool to control the sanity of the code and helps to keep it maintainable. An automated tool is meant to sniff code for signs of bad coding and apply known good patterns and practices when the code is so large that it would take a prohibitavely long amount of time to do so manually. This comes into play more in projects with multiple coders and many, many lines of code.

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You are missing the main point - reusability and maintainability.

The ad-hoc code may be simplistic, but often lacks generality - if you want to do something more complicated, you have to rewrite it. Using refactoring tools and approaches, you should be able to get a code, which is more general, pluggable into your other programs and is easy to change (maintain).

BUT - if your code already has these properties, do not do refactoring only for refactoring, its just a waste of your time and effort. Also you should be able to unterstand you refactored code better, than your previous code. If you don't - you are doing something terribly wrong, because refactoring should simplify, not obfuscate....

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If I've written a piece of code which is maybe a bit simplistic but I understand how every little bit works and if something goes wrong I can easily identify and correct the problem, why should I use a tool like ReSharper to turn my code into something I don't understand?

You should use such a tool to improve the design, not to turn it into something you don't understand. If you no longer understand the code, you have likely chosen an inappropriate refactoring.

Surely if you can't write the complicated code yourself, using a code refactoring tool is just going to cause issues because you won't be able to understand the new code when something goes wrong, and if you can write the refactored code manually why do you need the tool?

The refactoring tool is a convenience, to make the process of refactoring easier and maybe a bit safer. You indeed should be able to write the new code manually. Personally, I sometimes do a refactoring manually rather than using a tool.

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Yep, there is. Coding (in modern software processes) is almost a team work. So, just because you understand your code, that doesn't mean that everyone else will understand it.

And since you wont mabye be the only one who'll have to work with it, you should refactor your code and follow common rules (or arranged conventions) of code refactoring. (If you use a tool for that or do it manually, thats of course always a specific question)

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