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I'm currently working on a sound experiment, and I've come across one issue. I save an array of wave data to a .wav file and play it, but is there a way to skip this step and simply play the sound right from memory? I'm looking for a solution that will work cross-platform.

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StringIO maybe? –  F.C. Nov 19 '11 at 17:22
    
Could you please clarify whether your problem is with loading the file from memory only (but you know how to play it from python) or if you altogether don't know either of the two steps? [see comments to my answer to understand why I'm asking! :)] –  mac Nov 20 '11 at 0:02
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1 Answer

I suppose you are using the wave library, right?

The docs say:

wave.open(file[, mode])

If file is a string, open the file by that name, otherwise treat it as a seekable file-like object.

This means that you should be able to do something along the lines of:

>>> import wave
>>> from StringIO import StringIO
>>> file_on_disk = open('myfile.wav', 'rb')
>>> file_in_memory = StringIO(file_on_disk.read())
>>> file_on_disk.seek(0)
>>> file_in_memory.seek(0)
>>> file_on_disk.read() == file_in_memory.read()
True
>>> wave.open(file_in_memory, 'rb')
<wave.Wave_read instance at 0x1d6ab00>

EDIT (see comments): Just in case your issue is not only about reading a file from memory but playing it from python altogether...

An option is tu use pymedia

import time, wave, pymedia.audio.sound as sound
f= wave.open( 'YOUR FILE NAME', 'rb' ) # ← you can use StrinIO here!
sampleRate= f.getframerate()
channels= f.getnchannels()
format= sound.AFMT_S16_LE
snd= sound.Output( sampleRate, channels, format )
s= f.readframes( 300000 )
snd.play( s )
while snd.isPlaying(): time.sleep( 0.05 )

[source: the pymedia tutorial (for brevity I omitted their explanatory comments]

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That will let you read a WAV file from memory, but it won't let you play it. –  icktoofay Nov 19 '11 at 23:56
    
In case it's not clear, StringIO basically allows you to wrap memory buffers in file-like objects to work with MOST things that want files. –  dkamins Nov 19 '11 at 23:56
    
@icktoofay - Indeed. But I understand this is the problem the OP poster has: he can load [and play] a file from the disk, but doesn't know how to do to do the first bit (loading) from the memory... or did I miss anything? –  mac Nov 19 '11 at 23:58
    
@mac: The question asked how to play a WAV from memory, and your answer answered how to read it, but not how to play it. –  icktoofay Nov 19 '11 at 23:59
    
@icktoofay - I took it that he know how to play it already, but reading your comment I see the ambiguity in the question... I dropped a comment to the OP. –  mac Nov 20 '11 at 0:04
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