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Is it stable to use something like this in a class's ctor initialization list during implicit assignment (no operators are overloaded):

class C{
   public:
      C(int _var): var(_var), i(var*var) 
        {} 
   private:
      int var;
      int i;
};

I'm getting some eratic results, why is this?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Yes.

You might want to get rid of the initialization order dependency, and write:

  C(int _var): var(_var), i(_var*_var) 

Basically, by making i depend on var, you must ensure that var is declared before i in the class.

Similarly, you can initialize something in C that is defined (and initialized) in a parent class, because the parent will be constructed before C.

Best practices dictate that you be aware of the above, and avoid situations that obfuscate any of that - maybe document i's dependence on var, so that the next programmer (maybe yourself) doesn't introduce an initialization order issue.

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1  
I want to stress your second sentence: var must be declared before i in the class definition. Not in the initializer list (which doesn't matter). –  Mahmoud Al-Qudsi Nov 19 '11 at 18:36

That code has defined meaning, assuming the multiplication doesn't overflow.

Be aware that it relies critically on the fact that var is defined before i in the class (order in the initializer list is irrelevant, all that matters is the order the members themselves are defined). Otherwise i would be initialized using the unitialized data member var.

But if you're getting erratic behavior with exactly that code, then the bug lies elsewhere.

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Yes this is safe, but in this case you have to be careful. You are using var and not _var, so you have to be sure var is constructed before i. This is the case here, since the members are constructed in the order of their declaration (in this case var, i), which may be different from the order of their appearance in the initializer list.

So in this case it works. It would also work in this case:

C(int _var):  i(var*var), var(_var)

but not in this:

class C{
   public:
      C(int _var): var(_var), i(var*var) 
        {} 
   private:
      int i;
      int var;
};

But of course, to be always on the safe side, you could just use _var:

C(int _var):  var(_var), i(_var*_var)
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That worked! so the order of initialization in a ctor depends on the variables' order of declaration in the class prototype? That makes sense! –  user965369 Nov 19 '11 at 17:06
1  
@user965369 That is the reason you should also list them in this order in the initializer list (which you did), to avoid any confusion. –  Christian Rau Nov 19 '11 at 17:10
    
@user965369: You should turn on your compiler warnings (-Wall on gcc, \W3 on VC++), warning about an incorrectly ordered initializer list is common and will help you realize those mistakes earlier. –  Matthieu M. Nov 19 '11 at 17:45

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