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I'm supposed to take this code:

f x y z = x^3 - g (x + g (y - g z) + g (z^2))
 where g x = 2*x^2 + 10*x + 1

And rewrite it without where (or let).

They mean to write it with a Lambda function (\x ->...)

I'm trying to reuse a Lambda function on Haskell. Any ideas?

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6  
f = flip flip ((1 +) . ap ((+) . (2 *) . (^ 2)) (10 *)) . (flip .) . ap ((.) . (.) . (.) . (-) . (^ 3)) (((ap id .) .) . flip flip (flip id . (^ 2)) . (liftM2 (liftM2 (+)) .) . (. ((ap id .) . (. flip id) . (.) . (-))) . (.) . (.) . (+)): f made pointless by lambdabot –  FUZxxl Nov 19 '11 at 18:04

6 Answers 6

up vote 12 down vote accepted

As bravit hints at, you can rewrite a non-recursive let using a lambda in the following way:

let x = A in B     ==>     (\x -> B) A 

where x is a variable and A and B are expressions.

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5  
The thing I find funny about this trick is that it is actually a standard practice in Javascript since only functions can introduce a scope block there. –  hugomg Nov 19 '11 at 17:53
1  
I'm still not sure I understand how is one able to reuse it –  Asaf Nov 19 '11 at 18:39
    
@Asaf: You can refer to x multiple times in B. For example, take (\x -> x + x) 3. This is equivalent to 3 + 3, except you only had to write the 3 once. –  hammar Nov 19 '11 at 19:19
6  
@Asaf Here's a hint: remember that the arguments to a lambda may themselves be functions. –  Daniel Wagner Nov 19 '11 at 19:45

To reuse something you can make it an argument to something.

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I think the intention is what bravit hints at.
The smartypants follow-the-letters-of-the-law workaround is binding g with a case ;)

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2  
Another smartypants solution would be to make g a top-level function, since it doesn't close over anything from f :) –  hammar Nov 19 '11 at 17:43

To expand on hammar's and bravit's hints, your solution is going to require not just one lambda, but two - one of which will look a great deal like g, and the other of which will look a great deal like the second half of f

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Using lambda calculus g is (\x -> 2*x^2 + 10*x + 1)

So you need to substitute g with that in f x y z = x^3 - g (x + g (y - g z) + g (z^2))

$> echo "f x y z = x^3 - g (x + g (y - g z) + g (z^2))" | sed -r -e 's/g/(\\x -> 2*x^2 + 10*x + 1)/g'
f x y z = x^3 - (\x -> 2*x^2 + 10*x + 1) (x + (\x -> 2*x^2 + 10*x + 1) (y - (\x -> 2*x^2 + 10*x + 1) z) + (\x -> 2*x^2 + 10*x + 1) (z^2))

I'm just kidding, sorry.

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3  
I'm sure his instructors would be less than excited about that answer ;) –  Nate Nov 19 '11 at 17:55
1  
This is exactly the answer I'd give. As far as I know, the question boils down to "here, take this idiomatic code and make it worse, just to prove that you know X". If the teacher wants to check if I know X, they should pose a question where X is actually useful/necessary. –  Rafael Caetano Mar 7 '12 at 8:29

That question seems kinda curious and interesting for me. So, I'm trying to figured out what is lambda calculus is, find an answer and want to show it to OP (all hints have already been showed actually, spoiler alert).

Firstly, lets try to redefine f:

λ> let f = (\g x y z -> x^3 - g(x + g(y - g z) + g(z^2)))
f ::
  (Integer -> Integer) -> Integer -> Integer -> Integer -> Integer

So, we've got function, which get function and 3 numbers and return the answer. Using curring we can add g definition right here, like f_new = f g:

λ> let f = (\g x y z -> x^3 - g(x + g(y - g z) + g(z^2))) (\x -> 2*x^2 + 10*x + 1)
f :: Integer -> Integer -> Integer -> Integer

We're done. Let's check it:

λ> f 0 0 0
-13

The answer is correct.

UPD:

In those examples let is just a way to declare function in the interpreter, so final answer is:

f :: Num a => a -> a -> a -> a
f = (\g x y z -> x^3 - g(x + g(y - g z) + g(z^2))) (\x -> 2*x^2 + 10*x + 1)
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