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I have the following kml polygon:

<Polygon><outerBoundaryIs><LinearRing><coordinates>20.002,80.002 20,80.002 20,80.004 20.006,80.004 20.006,80.001 20.002,80.001 20.002,80.002 20.004,80.002 20.004,80.003 20.002,80.003 </coordinates></LinearRing></outerBoundaryIs></Polygon>

If I view this polygon in a cell in my fusion table, in the Table View of Google Fusion Maps, it looks like this:

enter image description here

However, in the actual google map, in the Map View, it looks like this:

enter image description here

The duplicate point has been rather annoyingly dropped. I want what's shown in the first diagram above, but how should I change my polygon to get the same shape in google maps?

I also tried with an inner bound, but no luck there either:

enter image description here

<Polygon><outerBoundaryIs><LinearRing><coordinates>20.002,80.002 20,80.002 20,80.004 20.006,80.004 20.006,80.001 20.002,80.001 20.002,80.002 20.004,80.002 20.004,80.003 20.002,80.003 </coordinates></LinearRing></outerBoundaryIs></Polygon>

Thanks,

Barry

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2 Answers 2

Self-intersecting polygons require quite a bit of extra power to draw correctly, so they are not widely supported in all 2d rendering APIs / implementations.

I suggest you work around the problem by splitting your polygon into two pieces.

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I've thought about doing this also, but as a last resort. –  Baz Nov 19 '11 at 20:50
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Ok, I think I have the answer. I can add a tiny offset (jitter) to one of the two duplicate points in the polygon. However I must add the jitter in the correct direction otherwise the polygon becomes invalid and google no longer draws it. Looking at the previous points in the polygon loop, I should be able to establish in which direction I need to apply the jitter in.

<Polygon><outerBoundaryIs><LinearRing><coordinates>20.002,80.002 20,80.002 20,80.004 20.006,80.004 20.006,80.001 20.002,80.001 20.002000001,80.002 20.004,80.002 20.004,80.003 20.002,80.003 </coordinates></LinearRing></outerBoundaryIs></Polygon> 
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