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I'd like to know when the user first does some scrolling on my page, as distinct from the browser-initiated scrolling that happens automatically when you reload a page.

  • If I try capturing the window's initial scroll position, and then registering an onscroll handler to tell me the scroll position has changed, I don't get too far: browser-initiated scrolling happens after document ready (jQuery's definition), so window.pageYOffset is always 0 on doc ready, even if the browser's right about to jump me down a hundred pixels.

  • If I try inspecting the onscroll event, nothing seems to let me distinguish a user-initiated event object from a browser-initiated one. The two events have pretty identical properties.

  • I'm looking for something a little more robust than what's suggested here: How to distinguish scrolling by mouse from scrolling programmatically in JavaScript?.

Thanks...

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You're in a bit of a pickle here, since user scrolling can be accomplished by click and drag of a scrollbar or mousewheel, and it turns out that mouswheel events SUCK. There are not consistent accross browsers, and a pain to analyse. –  Sinetheta Nov 19 '11 at 22:19

2 Answers 2

It's ugly, but possibly the best way to tell is by timing. I notice that on Chrome, the change in pageYOffset happens within 1 millisecond of the window.onload, while on Firefox, it happens within one millisecond of the dom loading. (haven't tested IE, but it is likely that one or the other works) For instance I added this to the bottom of a page:

  <script>
    window.onload = function () {
      var first = window.pageYOffset;

      setTimeout(function () {
          second = window.pageYOffset;
          alert("first: " + first + ", second:" + second)
        }, 1);
    };
   </script>

One chrome, "first" is 0, "second" is a big number, when refreshing a scrolled page. On firefox, that is only true if the below is added right before the closing body tag (which should be the same as jquery's document.ready).

  <script>
      var first = window.pageYOffset;

      setTimeout(function () {
          second = window.pageYOffset;
          alert("first: " + first + ", second:" + second)
        }, 1);
   </script>

I think you could detect a "browser refresh initiated" scroll reliably using this sort of technique, but obviously, it's not what I'd call a pretty solution and it might break on a future browser version.

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I use a similar technique for a scroll behavior on our home page, not the most elegant but it works well:

<html>
<head></head>
<body>
    <div style="height:500px;line-height:500px">
        <a id="bm" href="#bm">bookmarked</a>
    </div>
<script>
    (function(){

        var scrollingCanStart = false;

        //the user interact with the page
        window.onmouseover = window.onkeydown = function(e){
            scrollingCanStart = true;
        };

        //onscroll action
        window.onscroll = function(e){
            if(!scrollingCanStart){
                return;
            }
            console.log('manual scroll');
        };

    })();
</script>
</body>
</html>
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