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I would like to have several different function definitions for a member function in a templated class. Something like this:

template <typename T>
class MyClass
{
  void Foo();
  T val;

  //other functionality and data
};

  //handles all types
template <typename T>
void MyClass<T>::Foo()
{
  return val;
}

  //handles a special type in a different way
template <>
void MyClass<float>::Foo()
{
  return val + 5.0f;
}

I've tried implementing this as above and get a linker error for every special type I try to explicitly instantiate. The linker error mentions that the function has already been previously defined. Maybe I'm looking in the wrong places but I couldn't find any resources to help me figure out this problem :(

Q. Is this possible? If so, how do you do this and why does it work?

Thanks!

share|improve this question
    
I just pasted your definition in a header file, which I included from two different source files; in both source files I called the Foo() method for both an instance of the specialized and non-specialized template class. Everything works just fine with g++-4.4.3. Could you give some more details regarding the exact linker error and the structure of your project? –  misberner Nov 19 '11 at 22:29
1  
This should work; your problem must lie elsewhere. Make sure you're familiar with general template mechanics and headers and linking issues. –  Kerrek SB Nov 19 '11 at 22:35
1  
Works for me. –  Robᵩ Nov 19 '11 at 22:40
    
I defined the class in a header file and implemented that class in a .cpp file. The .cpp file is included at the foot of the header. The exact linker error was telling me that the function was already defined in one of my .obj files for the project. I tried to use it by including it in another file and creating an instance of the class and calling its members. I thought that perhaps the explicit instantiation was never being reached, but I get the same error when I move my generic template implementation underneath my specialization. Thanks, I hope this helps. –  KiraBox Nov 20 '11 at 23:09

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Here is a workaround that I frequently use. As it as been said before, you have to specialize the complete template. The idea is to make the method you want to specialize a static member of some struct (that should be nested and private for encapsulation reasons). Like this:

template< typename T >
class MyClass {

    struct PerformFoo {
        static void doFoo () {
            std::cout << "Foo for general type" << std::endl;;
        }
    };

public:
    void Foo () {
        PerformFoo::doFoo();
    }
};

template<>
struct MyClass< float >::PerformFoo {
    static void doFoo () {
        std::cout << "Foo for float" << std::endl;;
    }
};

Now in your main, the code

MyClass< int > myInt;
myInt.Foo();

MyClass< float > myFloat;
myFloat.Foo();

prints

Foo for general type
Foo for float

on your terminal. By the way: this does not involve any performance penalty with modern compilers. Hope this helps you.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, this definitely fixes the problem. So the reason this works is because I need to completely specialize that function call before use. And by making it the static member of a struct that my class can specialize ensures that before the call is reached that structure itself will be specialized, right? Thanks again for the help. –  KiraBox Nov 20 '11 at 22:58
    
Sorry for the delayed answer. I don't know if this is the 'correct' explanation, because I'm not an expert in C++ compiler implementation. I just know that this works and that this trick is used in a scientific project that I, among many others, am working on :) –  Sh4pe Nov 22 '11 at 23:54

By defining the specialized member function as inline function you will get rid of the link error complaining the specialized member function having been defined elsewhere.

//handles a special type in a different way
template <>
inline void
MyClass<float>::Foo()
{
  return val + 5.0f;
}

The reason being that a specialized function is no longer a function template, but a concrete function. Therefor it will be compiled several times when compiling source files that includes this header file which is why you get the "already defined" error.

Another solution is to move the implementation of the specialized function out of the header file and put it into the source file, meanwhile, declare the specialized function in the header file. Note that the declaration of the specialized member function must stay outside of the class definition:

/// Declare the specialized function in the header file but outside the
/// class definition. 
template <> void MyClass<float>::Foo()

/// Define the specialized function in .cpp file:
template <>
void
MyClass<float>::Foo()
{
  return val + 5.0f;
}
share|improve this answer

I've tried implementing this as above and get a linker error for every special type I try to explicitly instantiate.

What does that mean? If you explicitly specialize the template you cannot explicitly instantiate it anymore for the same template arguments. The whole purpose of an explicit specialization is to prevent the instantiation of it (which is a generated specialization) in favor of your explicit specialization.

So your description does not make sense to me. Just remember that you need to put definitions of templates and member functions of class templates in the header instead of in the .cpp file if you want to instantiate them implicitly. And that explicit specializations need to be declared to everyone who uses their template with their arguments.

// put this specialization into the header, for everyone to see
template <> void MyClass<float>::Foo();
share|improve this answer

It is not possible. When you specialize a template, you must specialize the entire template, which in this case means the entire class.

You can make foo a template function inside the template class. It is not exactly the same as what you are asking for, but it might meet your needs.

Update:

template<typename T> class Foo {
public:
    template<typename R> void foo() {printf("This is foo\n");}
    template<> void foo<float>() {printf("This is foo<float>\n");}
};

Or:

template<typename T> class Foo {
public:
    template<typename R> void foo() {printf("This is foo\n");}
    //template<> void foo<float>() {printf("This is foo<float>\n");}
};

template<> template<> void Foo<float>::foo<float>() {
    printf("This is foo<float>\n");
}

along with:

int main(int argc,char * argv[])
{
    Foo<int> iFoo;
    iFoo.foo<int>();

    Foo<float> fFoo;
    fFoo.foo<float>();

    return 0;
}

generates:

This is foo
This is foo<float>

The syntax for calling foo is a bit awkward.

share|improve this answer
    
I thought the same, but a simple experiment (using g++ 4.4.3) just proved me wrong. –  misberner Nov 19 '11 at 22:25

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