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I've just witnessed an insanely bizzare behaviour of the std::ofstream::write method. I am writing my own handling of Windows' BMP file format which includes saving a bitmap to a file - that's as an introduction. Here is a subroutine responsible for writing the header of the bitmap file, given reference to std::ofstream object.

void
BitmapFileManager::FileHeader::save(std::ofstream& fout) const
{
    word        w;  
    dword       dw; 
    char const* cw  = reinterpret_cast<char*>(w );
    char const* cdw = reinterpret_cast<char*>(dw);
    uint const  sw  = sizeof(w );
    uint const  sdw = sizeof(dw);

    fout.write(&sig1, sizeof(sig1));
    fout.write(&sig2, sizeof(sig2));
    dw = toLittleEndian(size);         fout.write(cdw, sdw);
    w  = toLittleEndian(reserved1);    fout.write(cw , sw );
    w  = toLittleEndian(reserved2);    fout.write(cw , sw );
    dw = toLittleEndian(pixelsOffset); fout.write(cdw, sdw);
}

The only thing to mark here is that sig1 and sig2 are both of type char, sizeof(word) = 2 and sizeof(dword) = 4. This code should result in twice writing a byte to a file, then a four byte chunk, two two byte chunks and finally a four byte chunk.

Take look at the hex dump of the result (there are also some things that follow, but ignore them):

00000000  42 4d 42 4d 00 00 00 05  00 05 42 4d 00 00 28 00  |BMBM......BM..(.|

sig1 and sig2 are printed twice, with a proper value which actually is B and M, at the beginning and for some strange reason also at 11th and 12th byte. I don't recognize other values among this line. But look what happens if I add a debug byte between every write:

void
BitmapFileManager::FileHeader::save(std::ofstream& fout) const
{
    word        w;  
    dword       dw; 
    char const* cw  = reinterpret_cast<char*>(w );
    char const* cdw = reinterpret_cast<char*>(dw);
    uint const  sw  = sizeof(w );
    uint const  sdw = sizeof(dw);

    char nil = '*';
    fout.write(&sig1, sizeof(sig1));
    fout.write(&nil, sizeof(nil));
    fout.write(&sig2, sizeof(sig2));
    fout.write(&nil, sizeof(nil));
    dw = toLittleEndian(size);         fout.write(cdw, sdw);
    fout.write(&nil, sizeof(nil));
    w  = toLittleEndian(reserved1);    fout.write(cw , sw );
    fout.write(&nil, sizeof(nil));
    w  = toLittleEndian(reserved2);    fout.write(cw , sw );
    fout.write(&nil, sizeof(nil));
    dw = toLittleEndian(pixelsOffset); fout.write(cdw, sdw);
    fout.write(&nil, sizeof(nil));
}

Hex dump becomes

00000000  42 2a 4d 2a 6c 3b 78 a0  2a 00 05 2a 00 05 2a 6c  |B*M*l;x?*..*..*l|
00000010  3b 78 a0 2a 28 00 00 00  28 00 00 00 28 00 00 00  |;x?*(...(...(...|

It seems like it's perfectly alright. There are no duplicates, and the * divides the string into sequence of 1-1-4-2-2-4 bytes as it should. Could someone help me find the reason of this? Is it a bug at compilation? I use gcc version 4.0.1 (Apple Inc. build 5490) on Mac OS X Leopard with -O2 but other levels didn't change anything.

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Can you reduce this to a minimal standalone test-case? (see sscce.org) –  Oliver Charlesworth Nov 19 '11 at 22:58
1  
Surely you meant to write char const* cw = reinterpret_cast<char>(&w) (note the & operator at the end) instead of ...(w), and likewise for cdw/dw? I'm surprised that runs without crashing. –  Adam Rosenfield Nov 19 '11 at 23:13
    
I surely did. Now it works flawlessly. The behaviour is still strange though. –  Marcin Kaczmarek Nov 19 '11 at 23:38

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Adam Rosenfield nailed it. You were taking the contents of a w (a word) and treating it as a pointer... and then all hell broke loose. Same thing for dw.

Random garbage after that...

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