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I have a confusion regarding the structure of the web.xml for the servlet mapping, I don't have any problem by executing it but I am trying to figure it how why we have such a pattern in the deployment descriptor.

<web-app>
    <servlet>
         <servlet-name>Servlet1</servlet-name>
         <servlet-path>foo.Servlet</servlet-path>
    </servlet>
    <servlet-mapping>
         <servlet-name>Servlet1</servlet-name>
         <url-pattern>/enroll</url-pattern>
    </servlet-mapping>
</web-app>

Now as far as my understanding whenever a request is comes for url-pattern "/enroll", servlet container is going to match the servlet-name with the url-pattern and will try to find the corresponding servlet-path and will forward the control to foo.Servlet. so basically there would be two passes one for finding servlet-name and another for servlet-path, my question is if container is designed to work in the following way

<web-app>
        <servlet>
             <servlet-name>foo.Servlet</servlet-path>
             <url-pattern>/enroll</url-pattern>
        </servlet>
</web-app>

what would be the drawback if we use the following approach. Wouldn't that be more efficient and the response time would be fast.

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Why do you think a different XML schema would affect runtime performance? –  Matt Ball Nov 19 '11 at 23:56
    
well I was just concern about the number of pass required to fetch the actual value –  Mike Nov 20 '11 at 0:14
1  
Typically, the servlet container just reads the web.xml and creates its representation in memory. It's magnitude times faster than reading the web.xml each time the request comes. –  Piotr Nowicki Nov 20 '11 at 0:34
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2 Answers

up vote 24 down vote accepted

It allows servlets to have multiple servlet mappings:

<servlet>
    <servlet-name>Servlet1</servlet-name>
    <servlet-path>foo.Servlet</servlet-path>
</servlet>
<servlet-mapping>
    <servlet-name>Servlet1</servlet-name>
    <url-pattern>/enroll</url-pattern>
</servlet-mapping>
<servlet-mapping>
    <servlet-name>Servlet1</servlet-name>
    <url-pattern>/pay</url-pattern>
</servlet-mapping>
<servlet-mapping>
    <servlet-name>Servlet1</servlet-name>
    <url-pattern>/bill</url-pattern>
</servlet-mapping>

It allows filters to be mapped on the particular servlet:

<filter-mapping>
    <filter-name>Filter1</filter-name>
    <servlet-name>Servlet1</servlet-name>
</filter-mapping>

Your proposal would support neither of them. Note that the web.xml is read and parsed only once during application's startup, not on every HTTP request as you seem to think.

Since Servlet 3.0, there's the @WebServlet annotation which minimizes this boilerplate:

@WebServlet("/enroll")
public class Servlet1 extends HttpServlet {

See also:

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks BalusC ... but in my approach you can define the multiple servlet like <web-app> <servlet> <servlet-name>foo.Servlet</servlet-path> <url-pattern>/enroll</url-pattern> <servlet-name>foo.Servlet2</servlet-path> <url-pattern>/work</url-pattern><servlet-name>foo.Servlet3</servlet-path> <url-pattern>/read</url-pattern> </servlet> </web-app> and the same we can to with the filter mapping –  Mike Nov 20 '11 at 0:10
    
You're basically creating 3 servlet instances instead of 1. Please read the "see also" links to understand better how servlets work. –  BalusC Nov 20 '11 at 0:19
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I'm pretty sure mapping is only optional. You're right that it seems redundant, but that't just how it is :)

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1  
It's only optional insofar as it can be replaced with @WebServlet. You always need something to map a URL pattern to a servlet. –  Matt Ball Nov 20 '11 at 3:30
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