Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a program where I have three classes A, B and C. A contains a member that is a list of B, and B consists of a member that is a list of C. A contains a method that is called RemoveB(), and similarly B contains a method that is called RemoveC(). RemoveB() and RemoveC() remove the first element of the BList and the CList respectively.

The following is what it all looks like:

class A
{
    ...
    List<B> BList;
    ...
    public void RemoveB()
    {
        this.BList.Removeat(0)
    }
}

class B
{
    ...
    List<C> CList;
    ...
    public void RemoveC()
    {
        this.CList.Removeat(0)
    }
}

class Trial
{
    ...
}

In my main function I first populate BList and the CList in each of these BList elements. There are N elements in BList and each of the BList elements contains M elements in CList. Then I do the following.

A aObject = new A(); // Populates BList and CList.

for(int i = 0; i < N; i++)
{
    Console.WriteLine("BList: {0} ({1})", i, aObject.BList[0].Count);

    for (int j = 0; j < M; j++)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("CList: {0}", j);
        aObject.BList[0].RemoveC();
    }
    aObject.RemoveB();
}

When I do this, I get the following problem. When I try to remove elements in CList belonging to element BList[0], the corresponding elements in CList in BList[1], BList[2]... BList[N-1] are also removed. The following is the output I see from the running the program.

BList 0 (M)
CList 0
CList 1
CList 2
.
.
.
CList M-1
BList 1 (0)
BList 2 (0)
BList 3 (0)
.
.
.
BList N-1 (0)

Could someone tell me why this could be happening? Am I doing some fundamental mistake somewhere.

share|improve this question
    
Thanks guys! I fixed the problem. It was an issue with references. I used copying the same object into the list that was the source of all problems. –  siva82kb Nov 22 '11 at 9:48

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Looks like a problem with how you're creating the B and C elements in the A constructor. Are you using the new keyword to create each individual B element and C element and list of C elements? If you're just copying them at some point, then they may still be the same actual object in memory, and changing or deleting one of them could do the same thing to the others as well.

share|improve this answer

How did you populate the BLists ans CLists under A? maybe you've created a single CList and used it to initialize all the B objects?

share|improve this answer
    
@siva: Could be that indeed. Don't forget List<T> is a reference type. –  Otiel Nov 20 '11 at 0:57

What about using a Queue of B or Queue of C instead of Lists? They should mirror the behaviour you want more naturally (I'd dequeue with while(queue.Count > 0) {...} loops). Also, it sounds like the problem is where you populate the lists. More precicely, I think your references might be screwed up. The code from there would help.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.