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I have a data set that looks like this:

ByYear <- data.frame( V1 = c(2005,2006,2007,2008,2005,2006,2008,2006,2007,2005,2006,2007,2008),
                      V2 = c(0.5,0.2,1,1.6,2,5,8,4,3,6,8,6,5), 
                      V3 = c('A','A','A','A','B','B','B','C','C','D','D','D','D'))

Which gives me

> ByYear
   V1   V2  V3
1  2005 0.5 A
2  2006 0.2 A
3  2007 1.0 A
4  2008 1.6 A
5  2005 2.0 B
6  2006 5.0 B
7  2008 8.0 B
8  2006 4.0 C
9  2007 3.0 C
10 2005 6.0 D
11 2006 8.0 D
12 2007 6.0 D
13 2008 5.0 D

Some of the years are missing from V1. This is due to an error in how the data were entered. I know this is a touchy subject, but I know for a fact that in this case a missing year in V1 means the value in V2 should be 0.

Is there a way I can create a new data set that adds a row with a zero value to any missing year like so:

> ByYear
  V1   V2  V3
  2005 0.5 A
  2006 0.2 A
  2007 1.0 A
  2008 1.6 A
  2005 2.0 B
  2006 5.0 B
  2007 0.0 B
  2008 8.0 B
  2005 0.0 C
  2006 4.0 C
  2007 3.0 C
  2008 0.0 C
  2005 6.0 D
  2006 0.0 D
  2007 6.0 D
  2008 5.0 D

Thanks for everyone for all your help!

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Are these really your only two columns? What differentiates the first sequence of years from the second? I ask this because without that your efforts seem rather pointless and they're difficult to implement. You need some kind of unique identification of each set of years. –  John Nov 20 '11 at 1:09
    
If those really are the only two columns... does order matter at all? –  John Nov 20 '11 at 1:27
    
Sorry guys, for simplicity I just kept it at two columns, but yes in fact there are multiple columns in my data set. In this above case for each grouping of years( 2005-2008) there would be a unique identifier found in a third column. But thanks again for taking a look at it. –  Vinterwoo Nov 20 '11 at 10:00
    
edit your question to include that third column and you can get an exact answer –  John Nov 20 '11 at 16:10
    
Sorry for the misleading data, I edited it to add column V3 –  Vinterwoo Nov 20 '11 at 18:09

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Use table to find the missing year/group combinations.

Frequencies <- with(ByYear, as.data.frame(table(V1, V3)))
MissingValues <- subset(Frequencies, Freq == 0, c(V1, V3))

Set the value of V2 to be 0 (or NA or whatver you want), then append this to your original dataset.

MissingValues$V2 <- 0
rbind(ByYear, MissingValues)
share|improve this answer
    
Awesome! Nice work thanks for that. That's a very elegant solution. How does the table function know that there are missing values? –  Vinterwoo Nov 21 '11 at 17:35
    
When you pass 2 parameters into table it gives counts for the matrix of all pairs of values of those parameters. Try it without the call to as.data.frame to see this more clearly. –  Richie Cotton Nov 21 '11 at 18:35
    
Also note that you can upvote as well as accepting an answer. –  Richie Cotton Nov 21 '11 at 18:36
    
Thanks Richie. By upvote, do you mean selecting the up arrow next to the answer? –  Vinterwoo Nov 21 '11 at 19:23
    
The table command is pretty sweet. Is there a way to get a similar table with means or sums as opposed to counts? –  Vinterwoo Nov 21 '11 at 19:24

There are several ways to do this, and the simplest is just by indexing.

Let's create some data first:

R> X <- data.frame(year=seq(2000,2010,by=1), val=0)
R> V <- data.frame(year=c(2003,2005,2007), val=c(1:3))

And let's look at it

R> X
   year val
1  2000   0
2  2001   0
3  2002   0
4  2003   0
5  2004   0
6  2005   0
7  2006   0
8  2007   0
9  2008   0
10 2009   0
11 2010   0
R> V
  year val
1 2003   1
2 2005   2
3 2007   3

So now we want to inject V into X at the right spots. A boolean match of where V appears in X makes that possible:

R> X[ X$year %in% V$year, "val"] <- V$val

Look at the result of X$year %in% V$year in isolation:

R> X$year %in% V$year
 [1] FALSE FALSE FALSE FALSE FALSE  TRUE FALSE  TRUE FALSE FALSE FALSE

So now the result:

R> X
   year val
1  2000   0
2  2001   0
3  2002   0
4  2003   1
5  2004   0
6  2005   2
7  2006   0
8  2007   3
9  2008   0
10 2009   0
11 2010   0
R> 

Caveat: You need regular indices for this to work. Years, or quarters or months work. Business days is harder, but there are other methods too.

share|improve this answer
    
That won't work in this case, the years aren't unique identifiers. It is the year combined with the years position in the list. –  John Nov 20 '11 at 0:55
    
Just create a new (problem-specific) index to map on. The approach is generic: replace where matched. –  Dirk Eddelbuettel Nov 20 '11 at 1:27

I tried to come up with a simple set of tests to make Dirk's suggestion work, but the repeating sequence with missing values stymied me. Brute force seemed too have mre promise. Identify the "interior" missing values and then indentify the gaps at either end where the increase by 1 rule may breakdown

for(i in seq_along(ByYear$V1[2:nrow(ByYear)]) ) if(
        ByYear$V1[i+1] -ByYear$V1[i] > 1){
         ByYear <- rbind(ByYear[1:i, ], c(v1[i]+1,0), ByYear[(i+1):NROW(ByYear), ])}

for(i in seq_along(ByYear$V1[2:nrow(ByYear)]) ) if(  
        ByYear$V1[i] ==2007 & ByYear$V1[i+1] != 2008 ){
         ByYear <- rbind(ByYear[1:i, ], c(2008, 0), ByYear[(i+1):NROW(ByYear), ])}
# I think you need to fill in all the missing 2008's before the missing 2005's
for(i in seq_along(ByYear$V1[2:nrow(ByYear)]) ) if(
        ByYear$V1[i] ==2008 & ByYear$V1[i+1] != 2005 ){
         ByYear <- rbind(ByYear[1:i, ], c(2005, 0), ByYear[(i+1):NROW(ByYear), ])}

ByYear
      V1  V2
1   2005 0.5
2   2006 0.2
3   2007 1.0
4   2008 1.6
5   2005 2.0
6   2006 5.0
7   2007 0.0
71  2008 8.0
9   2005 0.0
8   2006 4.0
91  2007 3.0
12  2008 0.0
10  2005 6.0
11  2006 8.0
121 2007 6.0
13  2008 5.0
share|improve this answer

A naive (non-vectorized) approach:

for (year in 2001:2010) {
   if (sum(ByYear["V1"]==year) == 0) {
      # add zero value for the found year
   }
}
share|improve this answer

As others have suggested, there are a number of ways to do this. Here's one using the fact that reshape will fill in holes in a complete matrix for you.

y <- reshape(ByYear, direction = 'wide', timevar = 'V1', v.names = 'V2', idvar = 'V3')
y <- reshape(y, direction = 'long')
y$V3[is.na(y$V3)] <- 0

Here's another that just uses replacement. First you construct a new data.frame (df) that contains a complete V1 and V3 but with V2 set to 0.

uV1 <- unique(ByYear$V1)
uV3 <- unique(ByYear$V3)
df <- data.frame(V1 = rep(uV1, length(uV3)), V3 = rep(uV3, each = length(uV1)), V2 = 0)

This is also helped by making a new interaction variable so that you can have a single unique identifier of each row.

df$i <- interaction(df$V1, df$V3)
ByYear$i <- interaction(ByYear$V1, ByYear$V3)

And now, in the new data.frame replace V2 with V2 from ByYear.

df$V2[df$i %in% ByYear$i] <- ByYear$V2
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