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For the code below, could anyone please tell me why the function always returns "0" if the return value for the base case (n==0) is 0? I know in order to correct this function, I'd simply have to replace "return 0" with "return 1", however, I'm trying to understand why does it return 0 for the base case below.

Thanks for your help

int factorial(int n) { 
    if (n == 0) { 
        return 0; 
    } else {
        return n * factorial(n-1);
    }
}

Edit: Hopefully, the code below has no logical errors ...

#include<iostream>
#include<math.h>
using namespace std;

long double factorial (long double n) {
    if (n==0) return 1;
    if (n<0) return -fabs((n*factorial(n+1)));
    return n*(factorial(n-1));
}

int main () {
    long double n;
    cout << "Enter a number: ";
    cin >> n;
    cout << "Factorial of " << n << " is " << factorial(n) <<endl;
    return 0;
}
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6  
You're pasting some random code and ask "why is this code what it is"? What sort of answer do you expect for that? –  Kerrek SB Nov 20 '11 at 0:54
1  
I know in order to correct this function, I'd simply have to replace "return 0" with "return 1" Your question is "why is this code wrong?"? It returns 0 for the base case because it doesn't understand the definition of 0!, I suppose –  Joshua Clark Nov 20 '11 at 0:57
    
Two words: Human error. –  Dennis Nov 20 '11 at 0:57
    
@KerrekSB Well, the sort of answers ppl have given below. Good luck commenting next time! –  user750993 Nov 20 '11 at 1:04

6 Answers 6

If you take a look at how the factorial is defined you'll find something like:

f(0) = 1
f(1) = 1
f(n) = f(n-1) * n

So your function does indeed return the wrong value for factorial(0). The recursion in this function basically works by decrementing n in every new function call of factorial.

Let's assume you call factorial(3). n would that with 3, the else branch will get executed as n does not equal zero. We follow the third rule of our definition an call factorial(2) (which is n-1) and multiply the result of it by n. Your function will step down until factorial(0) is called and returns 0 which then is a factor of all previous calculations, resulting in 3*2*1*0, and that equals to 0.

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This code is simply wrong. No matter which n > 0 it gets as argument, every value is eventually multiplied with 0 and therefore factorial( n ) = 0 for all n > 0.

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2  
Nothing is wrong with the code. It is the logic behind the code... –  NickLH Nov 20 '11 at 0:59
2  
And for n < 0 it recurs infinitely and then overflows the stack. –  Joshua Clark Nov 20 '11 at 0:59
1  
@NickLH Well, you knew what I meant, right? :) I was assuming that factorial(n) should calculate the factorial of n... –  Sh4pe Nov 20 '11 at 1:01
1  
@JoshuaClark hence the stackOverflow –  Shahbaz Nov 20 '11 at 1:01
    
@Sh4pe: The thing is, for any given piece of code, you can always imagine some other, different piece of code that does something else, correctly. As long as the OP isn't willing to describe her expectations, goals and problems, the question has no answer. –  Kerrek SB Nov 20 '11 at 1:08

It returns zero since any number times zero is zero. You start with some number n, say n=5. As you go through the recursion you have:

n * factorial(n-1)
5 * factorial(5-1)
5 * 4 * factorial(4-1)
5 * 4 * 3 * factorial(3-1)
5 * 4 * 3 * 2 * factorial(2-1)
5 * 4 * 3 * 2 * 1 * factorial(1-1)

But factorial(1-1) is factorial(0) which returns 0, so you get :

5 * 4 * 3 * 2 * 1 * 0 = 0
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Thanks bud, that makes sense. –  user750993 Nov 20 '11 at 1:07

For the code below, could anyone please tell me why the function returns "0" if the return value for the base case (n==0) is 0?

Someone chose to do that. You'd have to ask the author why they did that.

I know in order to correct this function, I'd simply have to replace "return 0" with "return 1", however, I'm trying to understand why does it return 0 for the base case below.

Likely because the person who wrote it thought 0! was equal to 0.

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I don't get you question entirely but lets cal the function f(int n): int okey to make it shorter

for n = 0 it will return 0 becaulse thats what you told it to do right: if(n == 0) return 0; for n + 1 youll get the folowing pattern: f(n+1) ==> n * f(n) becaulse thats wat you told it to do otherwise right? and f again will evaluate.

so thats why youre function will return 0 in any case and if you alter the base case to 1 youll get:

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For whatever n (bigger than or equal to 0), you multiply a lot of numbers down to factorial(0) which returns 0.

The result of

n*(n-1)*(n-2)*...*3*2*1*0

is a big fat 0

P.S. Besides not computing properly, the code has a major flaw. If you give it a negative number, you make it cry.

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