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If I just do it: Ex1:

#include <iostream>

int main()
{
    //try to call doSomething function
    doSomething();
}

void doSomething()
{
    std::cout << "Call me now!" << std::endl;
}

I get compilation error! Because the compile doesn´t know what is "doSomething".

But if I change the position of doSomething to come in first place, the program compiles successfully. Ex2:

#include <iostream>

void doSomething()
{
    std::cout << "Call me now!" << std::endl;
}

int main()
{
    //try to call doSomething function
    doSomething();
}

I can declare prototype to be like this: Ex3:

#include <iostream>

void doSomething(void);

int main()
{
    //try to call doSomething function
    doSomething();
}

void doSomething()
{
    std::cout << "Call me now!" << std::endl;
}

But why the first example does not work? Why I even have to declare a prototype or call functions first and main function at last?

Thanks!

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5  
It's like this: a friend tells you to flox the joxels. If you have never heard that before, you will not be able to do it. However, if your friend had previously told you what that means and how to do it, you will be able to do it. Also, if he has told you that he will explain it later, you will be able to do it when he explains it. But you can't do something you don't know how to do. –  Seth Carnegie Nov 20 '11 at 2:51
    
Note that the void in the function argument list is not necessary for C++; writing void doSomething(); is equivalent to void doSomething(void);. In C (don't know if this applies to C99) the first indicates a function that can take an unspecified number of arguments but in C++ it means that the function does not accept any arguments. –  Praetorian Nov 20 '11 at 3:20
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3 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You can't call a function without the compiler having seen either the definition or a declaration, first -- simple as that. A prototype or the actual definition must appear before a call.

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Why does c++ work this way? Java is smarter on this part. –  ComfortablyNumb Nov 20 '11 at 2:50
    
@Phil just because that's how it works. Java is way newer than C++ and I think this behaviour is a legacy of the time in which C++ was invented. Java is only smarter on this because it has learned from its parents. –  Seth Carnegie Nov 20 '11 at 2:52
    
No, not at all! Java can't call a method on an object without knowing that the object's type includes such a method. You can use reflection to call a method without this knowledge, I suppose, but that's not the same thing at all. Ruby can do it, and Python can do it, and other similar languages -- but not Java. –  Ernest Friedman-Hill Nov 20 '11 at 2:56
2  
Oh, you mean that Java can call a method whose definition appears later in the same file. Yes, well, that's because a Java compiler can make several passes over a source file, while C++ by definition does it in a single pass. In both cases, the compiler must know about the methods before it can call them -- in Java, though, it does a little more advance work before doing the actual code generation. –  Ernest Friedman-Hill Nov 20 '11 at 2:58
1  
My gut tells me this would be very hard for C++ compiler writers to "fix". The language offers a lot of ability to fundamentally extend the language with your own types, apply overloads, templates, and requires that the compiler deduce argument types, etc. If you suddenly want all of that without providing the prototypes to look through (or it has to assume that there may be additional candidates that may occur later that it must contend with) probably complicates things immensely. Maybe adding a single extra pass would work... but I'm not qualified to really contemplate that. –  Mordachai Nov 20 '11 at 3:02
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Because the compiler hasn't seen doSomething before it's used.

Either you must prototype it, or define it first, so that the compiler knows how to analyze the usage of it.

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This is a legacy from C. C is a single pass language which means that it has to do everything by only reading the file once. To be able to call a function without a forward declaration/prototype would require reading the file twice; The first time to find all the function signatures and the second time to actually compile.

C++ kept this requirement for features that were part of C, such as free functions and global variables. However classes are new to C++ and there was no need to keep the old way of doing things. So within a single class definition, multi-pass compilation is used. That's why you can do this:

class MyClass {
    void foo() {bar();}
    void bar() {}
};

But you can't do what you listed in your question.

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