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how can I find the matching strings in an array of strings in PowerShell:

example:

$Arr = "1 string first",
"2 string second",
"3 string third",
"4 string fourth"

Using this example, I want this returned:

" string "

I want to use this to find matching parts of file names and then remove that part of the file name (like removing the artist's name from a set of mp3 files for example), without having to specify which part of the file name should be replaced manually.

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1  
Sounds like you're looking for Longest Common Substring. A quick search and I don't see any PowerShell implementations of this algorithm online yet. –  Daniel Richnak Nov 20 '11 at 3:42
    
Thanks dude.. That put me in the right direction. I found a C# LongestCommonSubstring, which took only a few minutes to convert to PowerShell. Time to update the question. –  Winfred Nov 20 '11 at 5:26

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted
$arr =  "qdfbsqds", "fbsqdt", "bsqda" 
$arr | %{

$substr = for ($s = 0; $s -lt $_.length; $s++) {
           for ($l = 1; $l -le ($_.length - $s); $l++) {
            $_.substring($s, $l);
           }
          } 
$substr | %{$_.toLower()} | select -unique

} | group | ?{$_.count -eq $arr.length} | sort {$_.name.length} | select -expand name -l 1
# returns bsqd
  • produce a list of all the unique substrings of the inputstrings
  • filter for substrings that occur #inputstrings times (i.e. in all input strings)
  • sort these filtered substrings based on the length of the substring
  • return the last (i.e. longest) of this list
share|improve this answer
    
Elegant and short. Thanks!! –  Winfred Nov 26 '11 at 9:44
1  
This can be simplified somewhat by 1) only generating substrings for the shortest string ($shortest = $arr | sort Length | select -first 1), and 2) generating the substrings in order of length: $length..1 | foreach { $l = $_; 0..($length - $l) | foreach { $shortest.Substring( $_, $l ) } } | where { @($arr -match [regex]::Escape( $_ )).Count -eq $arr.Count } | select -first 1 –  Emperor XLII Feb 24 '12 at 1:12

If it ( the artist name etc) is only going to be a single word:

$Arr = "1 string first", "2 string second", "3 string third", "4 string fourth"
$common = $Arr | %{ $_.split() } | group | sort -property count | select -last 1 | select -expand name
$common = " {0} " -f $common

Update:

Implementation that seems to work for multiple words ( finding the longest common substring of words):

$arr = "1 string a first", "2 string a second", "3 string a third", "4 string a fourth"
$common = $arr | %{
$words = $_.split()
$noOfWords = $words.length
for($i=0;$i -lt $noOfWords;$i++){
    for($j=$i;$j -lt $noOfWords;$j++){
        $words[$i..$j] -join " "
    }
}

} | group | sort -property count,name | select -last 1 | select -expand name

$common = " {0} " -f $common
$common
share|improve this answer
    
It can be anything, a set of words, might have underscores, etc. –  Winfred Nov 20 '11 at 3:29
    
@Winfred - Then it becomes more complex if you want a set of words...You will have to spend some time on getting the code... –  manojlds Nov 20 '11 at 3:32
    
Worst case I can try something like converting each string to a chararray and then start comparing the individual chars. But mufti-dimensional arrays hurt my head really bad. I'm hoping someone might have a piece of code that does this already. –  Winfred Nov 20 '11 at 3:40
    
@Winfred - Since this is a common enough problem, I wrote something which seems to work. Updated answer. Try it out / expand on it. –  manojlds Nov 20 '11 at 3:46
    
It does work on single words or multiple words, but it breaks down when the strings don't contain spaces: $arr = "Name_Artist_Lovely", "Name_Artist_Song", "Name_Artist_SoPretty" Should return: "Name_Artist_" But returns: " Name_Artist_SoPretty" –  Winfred Nov 20 '11 at 3:55

Here is a "Longest Common Substring" function for two strings in PowerShell (based on wikibooks C# example):

Function get-LongestCommonSubstring
{
Param(
[string]$String1, 
[string]$String2
)
    if((!$String1) -or (!$String2)){Break}
    # .Net Two dimensional Array:
    $Num = New-Object 'object[,]' $String1.Length, $String2.Length
    [int]$maxlen = 0
    [int]$lastSubsBegin = 0
    $sequenceBuilder = New-Object -TypeName "System.Text.StringBuilder"

    for ([int]$i = 0; $i -lt $String1.Length; $i++)
    {
        for ([int]$j = 0; $j -lt $String2.Length; $j++)
        {
            if ($String1[$i] -ne $String2[$j])
            {
                    $Num[$i, $j] = 0
            }else{
                if (($i -eq 0) -or ($j -eq 0))
                {
                        $Num[$i, $j] = 1
                }else{
                        $Num[$i, $j] = 1 + $Num[($i - 1), ($j - 1)]
                }
                if ($Num[$i, $j] -gt $maxlen)
                {
                    $maxlen = $Num[$i, $j]
                    [int]$thisSubsBegin = $i - $Num[$i, $j] + 1
                    if($lastSubsBegin -eq $thisSubsBegin)
                    {#if the current LCS is the same as the last time this block ran
                            [void]$sequenceBuilder.Append($String1[$i]);
                    }else{ #this block resets the string builder if a different LCS is found
                        $lastSubsBegin = $thisSubsBegin
                        $sequenceBuilder.Length = 0 #clear it
                        [void]$sequenceBuilder.Append($String1.Substring($lastSubsBegin, (($i + 1) - $lastSubsBegin)))
                    }
                }
            }
        }
    }
    return $sequenceBuilder.ToString()
}

To use this for more than two strings, use it like this:

Function get-LongestCommonSubstringArray
{
Param(
[Parameter(Position=0, Mandatory=$True)][Array]$Array
)
    $PreviousSubString = $Null
    $LongestCommonSubstring = $Null
    foreach($SubString in $Array)
    {
        if($LongestCommonSubstring)
        {
            $LongestCommonSubstring = get-LongestCommonSubstring $SubString $LongestCommonSubstring
            write-verbose "Consequtive diff: $LongestCommonSubstring"
        }else{
            if($PreviousSubString)
            {
                $LongestCommonSubstring = get-LongestCommonSubstring $SubString $PreviousSubString
                write-verbose "first one diff: $LongestCommonSubstring"
            }else{
                $PreviousSubString = $SubString
                write-verbose "No PreviousSubstring yet, setting it to: $PreviousSubString"
            }
        }
    }
    Return $LongestCommonSubstring
}


get-LongestCommonSubstringArray $Arr -verbose
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1  
Should be able to run it multiple times, combining the results. Unless I just haven't gotten enough sleep, longest common substring should be transitive, so something like this should work: LCS(LCS(LCS(1 2) 3) 4). –  Daniel Richnak Nov 20 '11 at 6:07
    
Ah yes, of course. Updating my answer. –  Winfred Nov 20 '11 at 6:43
1  
I don't think that LCS is transitive. Consider these strings: "some big string", "some other big string", "some thing". If you did LCS(3, LCS(1, 2)) then you would get "ing" instead of "some " –  Tom H. Nov 22 '11 at 15:04
    
You're right. For my particular problem, this wasn't an issue, but I won't flag the question answered. I'll revisit the code some other time and try to figure out a better way to solve it. –  Winfred Nov 26 '11 at 9:41

If I understand your question:

$Arr = "1 string first", "2 string second", "3 string third", "4 string fourth"
$Arr -match " string " | foreach {$_ -replace " string ", " "}
share|improve this answer
1  
OP is asking how to find that the " string " is the common one. –  manojlds Nov 20 '11 at 3:18
    
That's correct. I'm trying to find that " string " is the common one. –  Winfred Nov 20 '11 at 3:34

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