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My list grabs user input, and creates a list - this list is in characters.

I would like to be able to check if the (car myList) is a character like #\1 or #\2, and then change the car of the list into 1 or 2.

I am using DrRacket.

The problem so far has been attempting to call either (set! (car myList) 1) or (list-set! (car myList) 1 )

Both are undefined references in my environment.

I just started working with scheme today, for a university assignment.

Any help would be greatly appreciated if anyone has time

Thanks

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4 Answers 4

By default, Racket does not provide mutable pairs, and thus no mutable lists either. That means that the values of pairs and lists are unchangeable.

However, you can (require racket/mpair), which, as the name implies, provides mutable pairs. You then use mcons, mcar, mcdr, mlist, etc. instead of cons, car, cdr, list.

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The other answers are correct, but might not be what you want. The more idiomatic Scheme/Racket way to do this would be to write a function that consumes the original input, and returns a new, separate list that has the modifications you want. (This is strongly preferred, hence lists being immutable by default.) So, for instance, you might write

(define (numberify-head lst)
  (cond
    [(eq? (car lst) #\1) (cons 1 (cdr lst))]
    [(eq? (car lst) #\2) (cons 2 (cdr lst))]
    [else lst]))

Your program would then go something like

(let* ([input (read-input-from-the-user)]
       [processed-list (numberify-head input)])
  ;; ... code that uses processed-list ...
  )
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Pairs in Scheme are mutable. But you don't mutate them using (set! (car myList) 1 ); rather, you would do (set-car! myList 1). You need to first find the pair that you want to mutate, and then call set-car! or set-cdr! on the pair (once you do car or cdr on it, that's just accessing the pair and not mutating it).

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up vote 0 down vote accepted

I used a stack implementation from this site:

http://zoo.cs.yale.edu/classes/cs201/Fall_2007/materials/pdfs/stacks.pdf

The stack let me , well i guess "mirror" my list. after i checked what symbol the user input character was, i would just push an appropriate character onto my stack.

(define (makeListFromSymbols myList)

  (display "Length of List = ")
  (display(length myList)) (newline)
   (cond

      ((null? myList) 
       (display "LIST IS NULL")(newline)

       (popTheRestOfStack)

       )
      ((eq? #\0 (car myList)) 
       (display "Equals 0") 
       (stackForExpression 'push! #\0)
       (makeListFromSymbols(cdr myList))
       (newline)
       )
      ((eq? #\1 (car myList)) 
       (display "Equals 1") 
       (stackForExpression 'push! #\1)
       (makeListFromSymbols(cdr myList) )
       (newline)
       )
      ((eq? #\2 (car myList)) 
       (display "Equals 2") 
       (stackForExpression 'push! #\2)
       (makeListFromSymbols(cdr myList))
       (newline)
       )
      ((eq? #\3 (car myList)) 
       (display "Equals 3") 
       (stackForExpression 'push! #\3)
       (makeListFromSymbols(cdr myList))
       (newline)
       )
      ((eq? #\4 (car myList)) 
       (display "Equals 4") 
       (stackForExpression 'push! #\4)
       (makeListFromSymbols(cdr myList))
       (newline)
       )
      ((eq? #\5 (car myList)) 
       (display "Equals 5") 
       (stackForExpression 'push! #\5)
       (makeListFromSymbols(cdr myList))
       (newline)
       )
      ((eq? #\6 (car myList)) 
       (display "Equals 6") 
       (stackForExpression 'push! #\6)
       (makeListFromSymbols(cdr myList))
       (newline)
       )
      ((eq? #\7 (car myList)) 
       (display "Equals 7") 
       (stackForExpression 'push! #\7)
       (makeListFromSymbols(cdr myList))
       (newline)
       )
      ((eq? #\8 (car myList)) 
       (display "Equals 8") 
       (stackForExpression 'push! #\8)
       (makeListFromSymbols(cdr myList))
       (newline)
       )
      ((eq? #\9 (car myList)) 
       (display "Equals 9") 
       (stackForExpression 'push! #\9)
       (makeListFromSymbols(cdr myList))
       (newline)
       )
      ((eq? #\+ (car myList)) 
       (display "Equals +") 
       (handleAdditionOperator)
       (makeListFromSymbols(cdr myList))
       (newline)
       )
      ((eq? #\/ (car myList)) 
       (display "Equals /") 
       (handleDivisionOperator)
       (makeListFromSymbols(cdr myList))
       (newline)
       )
      ((eq? #\- (car myList)) 
       (display "Equals -") 
       (handleSubtractionOperator)
       (makeListFromSymbols(cdr myList))
       (newline)
       )
      ((eq? #\* (car myList)) 
       (display "Equals *") 
       (handleMultiplicationOperator)
       (makeListFromSymbols(cdr myList))
       (newline)
       )
      ((eq? #\( (car myList)) 
       (display "Equals (")
       (stack1 'push! #\( )

       (makeListFromSymbols(cdr myList))
       (newline)
       )
      ((eq? #\) (car myList)) 
       (display "Equals )") 

       (popAndTransferUntilLeftBracket) 

       (makeListFromSymbols(cdr myList))
       (newline)
       )
      (else (display "Character is invalid")(newline) (makeListFromSymbols(cdr myList)))
      )

  )

if anyone ever has similar questions on this, or about my code / functions, email me. ( i think my email is shown on my user page?)

i also have a pseudo code algorithm for conversion of infix to post fix notation (that was the assignment here)

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