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I'm writing a set of C++ parameterized classes and I'm interested in some of them behaving similarly to pointers. In particular, I want to be able to create an object with a constant template parameter from an object with a non-constant template parameter, but not the other way around. This sample code should clarify my intentions:

int main() {
  myClass<int> mc_int;
  myClass<const int> mc_const_int;

  myClass<const int> mc1(mc_const_int); // This should compile.
  myClass<int> mc2(mc_int);             // This should compile.
  myClass<const int> mc3(mc_int);       // This should compile.
  myClass<int> mc4(mc_const_int);       // This should NOT compile.
}

I have been able to achieve this particular behavior by creating the next class hierarchy (simplified for readability):

template <typename T>
class Base {

  // ...

protected:

  template <typename U>
  Base(const Base<U> &obj): _elem(obj._elem) {}

private:

  T _elem;

  friend class Base<const T>;
};

template <typename T>
class myClass: public Base<T> {

  // ...

public:

  template <typename U>
  myClass(const myClass<U> &obj): Base<const U>(obj) {}
};

And it works as expected, but I'm not entirely satisfied with this design because I can only detect a non-constant template parameter from the constructor, but not from any other member function.

If I wanted, for example, to create a container class with an addAll() method, I would like to be able to do this:

int main() {
  Container<int> c_int;

  c_int.add(new int(1));
  c_int.add(new int(2));
  c_int.add(new int(3));

  Container<const int> c_const_int;

  c_const_int.addAll(c_int); // This should compile.
  c_int.addAll(c_const_int); // This should NOT compile.
}

But I don't know how to achieve the previous behavior. Does anyone have ideas for an alternate design to achieve what I'm trying to do? Does anyone know of a link where this problem is discussed in more depth?

Thanks in advance.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

One way to do this is via partial template specialisation. You should define the class for non-const types as you usually would:

template <typename T>
struct MyClass {
    void f(T&);
};

Then define a specialisation

template <typename T>
struct MyClass<T const> {
    void f(T&);
    void f(T const&);
};

Unfortunately, this leads to code duplication, but it should allow you to do what you want. Naturally, you can have the functions take MyClass<T>& and MyClass<T const>&, too.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks a lot for your answer, this is exactly what I was looking for. I would have liked to find a workaround by specializing methods instead of whole classes but I think there is no way to do that given the behavior I want for the class. Sadly, my class has gone from 500 lines to 1000, but I don't mind as long as the behavior is the desired one. –  Kanopus Nov 25 '11 at 22:44

I'm kind of understand the question a bit. You probably can use template specialization.

template <typename T>
class container
{
public:
   template<typename U>
   void addAll(const container<U>& b ){}
private:
   template<>
   void addAll(const container<int>&b); //No implementation
};

container<int> b;
....
container<const int> a;
a.addAll(b) ; //Give a link error, I can't understand why vc2010 compile and run this line though
share|improve this answer

One possibility is using member function templates, enabling them so as to achieve the combinations you want.

#include <utility>

template <class T, class U>
struct const_convertible;

template <class T>
struct const_convertible<T, T>: std::true_type {};

template <class T>
struct const_convertible<T, const T>: std::true_type {};

template <class T>
struct const_convertible<const T, T>: std::false_type {};

template <class T>
class X
{
public:
   X() {}
   X(const X&) {} //copy constructor
   //conversion constructor as needed
   template <class U>
   X(const X<U>&, typename std::enable_if<const_convertible<U, T>::value, void>::type* = 0)
   {}

   template <class U>
   typename std::enable_if<const_convertible<U, T>::value, void>::type f(X<U>) {}
};

int main()
{
   X<int> mut;
   X<const int> con;

   X<int> a(mut);
   //X<int> b(con);
   X<const int> c(mut);
   X<const int> d(con);

   mut.f(mut);
   //mut.f(con);
   con.f(mut);
   con.f(con);

   //X<double> doub;
   //doub.f(mut);
}
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